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I am a software developer and working on a lead position in a company. I asked my boss, with decision power in the company for salary raises, for a salary raise as I am very below average for my experience and the duties for which I am responsible. The boss offered me to change the project on which I am working on and do another project in the company where a senior resource is needed(for a salary raise). When I analyzed that project I came to know that it is utilizing very old technologies (NOT in demand now a days). There is no learning in that project and I know even then the raise will barely put me at the average line salary-wise (I am very below average right now). My current project is utilizing newer technologies and frameworks (in demand now a days). So I nicely apologized and expressed my will to keep working on the current project instead of working on the older project. In reply my boss asked me about my long term plans. I am confused what does that mean?

Update: I am already looking for a job switch but am confused if I should tell my boss or not. The boss has already told me that they cannot afford the requested raise until next 7-8 months. I don't wana tell them that I want to leave the job ASAP.

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  • Surely that wasn't the end of the conversation. How did you answer the question and what did your boss say next?
    – user62847
    Aug 4 '18 at 12:59
  • Are you below average in salary for your company, or below average of what you think is market rate? Aug 4 '18 at 14:54
  • May I ask why was this question given 3 downvotes? I am confused.
    – ITExpert
    Aug 6 '18 at 8:59
  • 1
    I can think of several reasons for the ownvotes: Your question is incomplete (see stretch's comment), and how can we know what your boss's intentions for the question are? We are not clairvoyant and can only guess (BTW Joe's guess is a nice one).
    – user8036
    Aug 6 '18 at 9:25
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In reply my boss asked me about my long term plans. I am confused what does that mean?

You asked for a raise.

Your boss offered to put you on a project where you could get a raise.

You turned it down.

Most likely your boss is trying to figure out what you really want - do you just want to work on the projects you choose, or do you want to work on what the company needs done in exchange for a raise?

In some companies, demonstrating that you are willing to do the unpopular tasks is a good way to get a raise. Demonstrating that you are unwilling to do those is a good way to not get raises.

But there's no way for anyone beside you and your boss to know what he actually meant. We would all just be guessing. If you want to know, you should talk to him.

I am already looking for a job switch but am confused if I should tell my boss or not.

Don't. There is nothing to be gained by announcing that you are actively seeking a new job.

Figure out what you really want in a job - both the financial aspects and the career growth aspects. Find a suitable new job. Get and accept a formal offer. Then give your notice and work the notice period. Then leave.

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  • I have updated my answer. In short I am already looking for a job but does not want to tell them that I want to leave as soon as I get a new job.
    – ITExpert
    Aug 4 '18 at 12:28
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(S)he's probably just inviting you to think where you want to go, what is important to you and what would make you happy.

Assuming your boss has more experience than you, it could be useful to discuss your plans with her/him if that's possible. Sometimes people are astonished when they figure out what is really important to them.

Thinking longer-term often gets lost in day-to-day business. Maybe your boss is aware of that and wants to trigger this process for you.

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  • I have updated my answer. In short I am already looking for a job but does not want to tell them that I want to leave as soon as I get a new job.
    – ITExpert
    Aug 4 '18 at 12:29
  • Spending some time thinking out your goals, values, etc every now and then is a good idea, regardless if you're already looking for a new job. :-) Aug 4 '18 at 12:38
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So your boss wanted to demote you from lead to senior in order to pay you more?!

That doesn't make sense.

Leads usually earn more.

The only issue I can see is that your project doesn't have the budget for an appropriately paid lead, while the other has it for an overpaid senior...

Disregarding your decision to potentially leave, you still could tell your boss what you'd like to achieve longer term and emphasize why you earned a raise.

Good luck.

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It means they want to continue exploiting your agreeable character. There is no reason to keep your salary below average, unless you signal that you accept the situation and let them continue like this.

Your boss is trying to frame the negotiation as if you need to give something back, i,e move to a certain project or promise to stay longer. Or he is testing whether you can be bullied with references to the future. Don’t fall for this technique.

Ask in a professional manner for a raise to the level you deserve. If you get a no, or other type of pushback, start looking for a place where you are paid properly. In such a situation, the starting salary at the new job will be a basis for future raises, so make sure you ask for the right amount before accepting future offers.

Edit: the updated question shows that the company doesn’t have the intention of raising the salary to desired level, at least not for several months. In such a case, if you want a better salary, the solution is (like I stated above) to start looking for a new job. As with any job search situation, your affairs is your own business. Keep it secret from your employer until you signed a new contract.

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  • I am already looking for a job but does not want to tell them that I want to leave as soon as I get a new job.
    – ITExpert
    Aug 4 '18 at 12:29
  • ITExpert and rightly so, you should never say anything about your job search until you signed the new contract.
    – frankhond
    Aug 4 '18 at 17:15

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