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Let's say you're applying to a job application and in either your cover letter or the email you send to your recruiter, you write something that resembles this:

"I believe that the knowledge I've acquired over the years in this domain will help me perform to expectations at this position, if selected".

Note that this question is not about whether or not you should include such a sentence at all -- it's about the specific effect the phrase "if selected" has -- does having this phrase give away low self confidence? Or does omitting this phrase indicate smugness?

closed as primarily opinion-based by gnat, Dukeling, BigMadAndy, Mister Positive, OldPadawan Aug 17 '18 at 9:19

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I would say that including this phrase really doesn't add or take away anything at all. Really it's just fluff, and most people are just going to read over the phrase and ignore it. That's assuming of course that you don't over-use it in every other sentence and make it stand out, which would really just reflect poorly on your writing ability.

My personal opinion is that it doesn't hurt you, but it doesn't help you either, so why include it when you can be using the space for something more interesting? You can convey the same meaning by using "would" instead of "will" in your writing.

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    I agree with this, and wouldn't spend too much time worrying about it. No one is going to think OP is talking about what a great job they'd do for the company if they were not selected, so any discussions about being able to handle the job imply "if selected." As such, OP can be comfortable knowing that this is understood by all and leave it out. – PoloHoleSet Aug 14 '18 at 18:22
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"I believe that the knowledge I've acquired over the years in this domain will help me perform to expectations at this position, if selected".

Note that this question is not about whether or not you should include such a sentence at all -- it's about the specific effect the phrase "if selected" has -- does having this phrase give away low self confidence? Or does omitting this phrase indicate smugness?

Having this phrase included makes the statement weaker than it needs to be. Including it adds nothing of value.

Remove the phrase and be positive that you will get the position.

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