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I graduated from college and took a internship transitioning into a full time offer this January, and have been working for the company as a full time intern for 3 months, part time intern for 3 months, and full time software engineer for 8 months.

However, over the course of the 8 months, we started off with 11 engineers, but the lead engineer left, 3 senior engineers left, and now the VP of engineering left as well, and I feel like I've been taking on much more responsibilities since these departures.

Should I wait to finish a year here at least before asking for a raise? Or is it too early to even ask for a raise as I'm only 8 months out of college? I don't want to come off as the type of person that only cares about money, but at the same time I feel like my responsibilities and skills are now underrepresented by my current salary.

closed as off-topic by Dukeling, gnat, Michael Grubey, mxyzplk, Mister Positive Aug 30 '18 at 2:29

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Should I wait to finish a year here at least before asking for a raise?

Yes. Or at least wait until the next annual performance review (if your company holds those).

at the same time I feel like my responsibilities and skills are now underrepresented by my current salary.

At many companies, raises don't automatically coincide with the day you take on new responsibilities. They are earned over time.

The fact that you have been given more responsibility is a good thing. If you excel at these, you could anticipate getting a raise at the appropriate time.

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First off, I would like to address not wanting to seem like a person that just wants more money. If you just want more money just because then yes you should feel like a bad person, but what you described isn't that. Why is a bad thing to fight be paid what you are worth? For profit companies can only make money if they bring in more money than it costs to operate and sadly one of the strategies to keep costs down is to pay your workers less money!

Back to your immediate situation, the high turnover scenario is a classic problem. You take on more responsibilities in the hope that you will get title change or a salary bump, but that might be the exact reason why more senior members of your team have left.

You can follow your company's annual compensation cycle or even do it off cycle. I would do it soon, because what you described sounds like there might be something bigger going on. I would detail what you have been able to accomplish in the time you have been with the company and you believe that is commensurate with a higher salary. Definitely do your homework see what the going rate is for your skills in the open market. With the high turnover, your company might offer you a stay bonus and/or stocks options to keep you at the company.

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