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I was about to give my manager two weeks notice today, but he called sick, and I have today's date on the resignation letter.

When he comes back, should I reprint the letter with the date when he comes back and give him the letter then, or keep today's date (to keep the actual two-week notice date on it)?

Also, should I email him the resignation email today before I talk to him, and give him the official resignation letter when he's back in the office.

Essentially, I will be leaving the company two weeks from today, and the notice will be effective for less than the two weeks.

Note: I did a search before and found Boss is unable to attend resignation meeting, although it is similar I don't think it covers my question in full.

marked as duplicate by Erik, gnat, gazzz0x2z, Mister Positive, Twyxz Sep 18 '18 at 7:04

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Since your direct manager is out sick, you could just turn it into their boss or HR. Do one of those two things and don't worry about re-printing the letter.

In your case, I would email your boss, their boss, and HR since you have a plethora of management out of commission.

Also, as pointed out in the comments, you should also put a hard copy of the letter on your manager's.

  • The problem is that his manager is located in a different country. HR is outsourced, so I will have to email them about it, and the branch manager is on vacation. In other words, at the moment, there are no managers in the office except other colleagues from mine and other departments.<p> Also, if I send the email to HR, should I cc my manager, his manager, and other potential managers I work with? – Rezkin Sep 17 '18 at 14:13
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    I would also put a paper copy of the resignation letter in the immediate boss' in-tray or mail slot, but it should be an exact copy of what was e-mailed, including the date. – Patricia Shanahan Sep 17 '18 at 14:17
  • You are handing in a resignation notice, not requesting permission to resign. A resignation is an unilateral act, it does not need the approval of your manager. Hand it over to HR and be done with it. – BoboDarph Sep 18 '18 at 9:53

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