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I work at a staffing company that specializes in connecting freelance professionals to organizations and agencies.

According to the contract I signed, I'm a W-2 employee working for them, but will be doing assignments for their clients. So while I'm on their payroll, I don't go to their offices or interact with their employees. My sole interaction is with their clients.

My latest assignment ended last month. While I'm not currently doing any assignments for the staffing company, I'm still employed by them.

I'm currently interviewing for full-time opportunities. In any job application, I'm required to list my current and past employers and provide the dates in which I started and ended work.

I find it hard to explain that my latest job was with company X, although I'm not really hired by X; I'm hired by Y. And while I'm not currently doing any work for Y, the staffing company, I'm still employed by them.

How to explain my situation on paper or during an interview?

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    I think you should said you last work was for Y doesn't matter you client was X. Is like if you work for a food catering company you said my company was Delicious Food Catering and not you serve food for Beyonce birthday even when that would be cool. – Juan Carlos Oropeza Sep 17 '18 at 19:54
  • "While I'm not currently doing any assignments for the staffing company, I'm still employed by them." - does this mean you draw a regular, steady salary, regardless of whether your time is being fully billed to a client for any particular week? – PoloHoleSet Sep 17 '18 at 20:58
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I find it hard to explain that my latest job was with company X, although I'm not really hired by X; I'm hired by Y. And while I'm not currently doing any work for Y, the staffing company, I'm still employed by them.

How to explain my situation on paper or during an interview?

It's easy. You work for Company Y. It's as simple as that.

On paper, you indicate that you are employed by Company Y. In the area where you list your tasks, you indicate the tasks you perform at various companies.

In an interview, you do the same - you talk about the work you did. If asked, and if you are permitted to disclose them, you can also talk about the companies where you did the actual work.

This isn't an unusual situation at all. Employers will understand.

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You list the time you worked as an employee of the contracting firm.

On your resume state who you have the W2 relationship with (your employer). Then state what you did in your various placements as if those were different positions within the same company (in one sense they are). Talk about what you accomplished at your various postings (normal resume stuff).

One thing not to do is mention the companies you were assigned to on your resume. With many companies (at least in my experience) all employment references first go to HR. This could be at best confusing and at worst cost you a job as a reference check will not show the assignment. The time to bring up is when you get to the interview stage. If you've got permission just say "I was assigned to Flibbuit for six months and here is what I did...". Again, talk about your accomplishments and not where you were assigned.

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I'm actually in a similar situation myself right now.

I don't tell people I work for Staffing Firm X, I tell them that I work for Company Y. The reason is that for the purposes of getting past the resume stage, that is where all my work is, where my references are, and where my experience originates from. Literally, nothing substantial happens from Staffing Firm X besides my paycheck.

Once you make it to the interview you stage you can further elaborate upon that if there are questions. Since you are working through a staffing firm, this can also be handled by whomever your account manager is.

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