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As a double-major in Maths and Computer Science, my strengths lie mostly in theoretical computer science, and especially computational geometry. (This doesn't mean I have no clue about the 'real' world. In fact, I have been working as an intern for a software company building real software.)

Now that I am graduating, I would like to look for my 'dream' job,ie., the one that allows me to do the things that I am best at and most interested in, not just doing the things that I can do.

So how should I 'translate' my interest and strengths (as described above) into a concrete description of the kind of position I am looking for in some company?

closed as too localized by Jim G., Rhys, jcmeloni, CincinnatiProgrammer, MrFox May 28 '13 at 13:45

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  • Could you clarify a bit more on your question? Are you asking how to best go about searching for a job in a specialist field? Are you asking how to craft a resume for a specific field? Is there a specific company that wants people for jobs A and B, both of which you are qualified for, but you want to make sure that you only are considered for job A and want to know how to say that? – jmac May 28 '13 at 6:45
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    the one that allows me to do the things that I am best at and most interested in <--- it sounds like what you need to do is 1) list of what you are most interested in and 2) find a job which does them. – enderland May 28 '13 at 11:42
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    While this notes a subject matter, this doesn't state what kind of work you want to do in the field. Is it research some new theory in the field? Is it create new applications of existing research? Is it teach students about this subject? There are lots of things you could do with this knowledge and that is what you left out here. – JB King May 28 '13 at 14:57
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Computational geometry is quite far from being purely theoretical.

Your first step should be building a list of companies that have active projects with some computational geometry component.

Use CiteSeerX to find authors of top papers and their corporate affiliations. Alternatively, just run a query on SeerSeer to get the list of top "experts" out of the box. Here's the query I ran for you: http://seerseer.ist.psu.edu/expert?stype=topic&query=computational+geometry

Then look for open positions in the companies in the list that match your skill set. You can also send cv's without open positions as a last resort.

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Sounds like game engine development to me.

Actively pursue jobs in companies which do 3D games. You might want to have a look at the company culture at Valve to see if it would be a good fit.

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