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At my work, our desks are rather high and not adjustable. I bought a chair I use at home, but the height of the desk seems to be causing back issues which have gotten much worse since the start of my work half a year ago. I've seen a physio therapist and she recommended that I ask for an ergonomic assessment.

Could this work, given the nature of our cubicle setup? Could asking for this draw unwanted attention or backfire? Are they legally obligated to provide this?

Further, how could I find out in a future job search how well the company takes care of ergonomics, especially if I am interviewing remotely?

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Could this work, given the nature of our cubicle setup?

Yes it should. Each setup has its own considerations, so the fact that this is a cubicle setup doesn't mean there is no room for ergonomics.

Could asking for this draw unwanted attention or backfire?

No, it shouldn't as long as you do it politely and professionally.

Are they legally obligated to provide this?

As you are in Canada, it seems they are. I am not a lawyer, but this page from the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety gives several specifications and guidelines on selecting and using Ergonomic chairs. Furthermore, it seems they also have guidelines on Working in a Sitting Poistion, that may be also useful for you to consider.

Further, how could I find out in a future job search how well the company takes care of ergonomics, especially if I am interviewing remotely?

Most likely any company you interview with will take care of ergonomics.

However, if you still want to ask, expose to them your need for an ergonomic/comfortable chair to sit during the job-searching process (email, interviews, etc), and ask if such thing is possible (having a medical note to back you up would be best in any case). This will help you know in advance if ergonomics will be an issue.

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    i find its not really worth bringing up in the interview. in Western countries, because they're legally obligated to help you, they will. while it's not really a "oh they're pregnant" kind of thing, why add extra doubt when it doesn't matter? – bharal Oct 23 '18 at 17:10
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    @bharal you are right. In most places this is implicit. However, OP wanted to know a way of being completely sure and explicit ergonomics is supported. Most likely every time OP tries to ask that they will get a Yes for an answer though ... :) editing answer as per your suggestion – DarkCygnus Oct 23 '18 at 17:12
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It is definitely an option in a cubicle setup. Me myself have gotten a different chair than everyone else (even if the general ergonomy is rather good) to accommodate my back problems.

I don't know about Canada, but at least here in Sweden the employer is required to make that kind of accommodation (adjustable table, different chair, whatever) if the employee needs it (with a reference from you physio therapist). They are also required to provide an "ergonomic work environment" so even if you don't have medical reasons for it it can still be worth a shot.

When it comes to interviewing I usually say that "I have a minor back problem and was wondering if their office has adjustable tables so I can alternate sitting/standing". That is a relatively safe way to start a conversation on ergonomics without it sounding like a complete deal-breaker.

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