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Retracted resignation after counter offer and now l realise its a mistake, how do l resign effective immediately?

Can my employer charge me for replacement?

I am based in New Zealand.

closed as unclear what you're asking by gnat, Martin Tournoij, IDrinkandIKnowThings, Dmitry Grigoryev, The Wandering Dev Manager Nov 15 '18 at 20:01

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    Just a few questions to help answer this: Which country are you in? Did you sign the new offer or just verbally say you accepted it? Does your new contract say anything about penalties for resigning within a timeperiod of accepting it? Do you simply want to terminate the employment or are you also trying to get a good reference? In what way are you worried the employer can charge you? (The likely answer is: "Just serve a new notice, and leave at the end of that period, as usual.") – Bilkokuya Nov 14 '18 at 10:54
  • I am located in NZ. No mention of any further terms other than what is already outlined in my contract. I havent actually signed it yet. Have another job offer. Did not gain refrences from current employer – B. Edwards Nov 14 '18 at 14:01
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how do l resign effective immediatly?

Well unless your counter-offer included some sort of minimum-time related bond (which I believe is possible in some jurisdictions) I doubt they can stop you resigning. In the majority of locales though it would be effectively considered a "new" resignation so any contractual or legal notice periods required would begin from that date rather than the earlier one. Of course some employers may choose not to enforce that aspect but bear in mind that they might not be feeling too kindly disposed to you given your, erm, indecisiveness so you might be best off just taking it on the chin without too much complaint.

Can my employer charge me for replacement?

This would be an exceptionally rare possibility, unless your actually breaching a contractual term somewhere the costs of hiring a replacement are pretty much the employer's problem not yours.

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