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This question already has an answer here:

I've been working for almost 2 years at this company, and had scheduled my vacation for January 2019.

This week I received a better job offer, paying almost twice as much as I get now, in a larger company. (I was not actively looking for a job, the offer came through LinkedIn).

I'll be interviewed next Monday, and maybe I'll get the job. But what if I get it? I was planning to travel for 3 days, the tickets have already been bought, everything has already been organized.

How do I explain this to my new employer? Should I comment on this during the interview?

marked as duplicate by Kate Gregory, Jim G., gnat, SliderBlackrose, dwizum Nov 27 '18 at 18:55

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When they make an offer (negotiating salary), bring this up.

Usually it's not a problem at all to have a couple commitments with a new hire. The ordinary practice is just to take them as non-paid days.

If they want you, this is nothing that they will flinch at (3 days). If you had more than a week, it might be something to be concerned about.

When you're negotiating your salary is when to bring this up.

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    Thank you for the advice! I'm a bit nervous about my interview, since it's my first (I got my first job on recommendation) and even more nervous about this detail. But I will follow your advice and comment on the outcome when I am interviewed. – LuizLoyola Nov 16 '18 at 22:54
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    Having read this, I will offer no answer of my own, this is the right answer. – Richard U Nov 17 '18 at 0:21
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    Assuming the new job will begin before January 2019 of course (; – DigitalBlade969 Nov 18 '18 at 8:20
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I was planning to travel for 3 days, the tickets have already been bought, everything has already been organized.

How do I explain this to my new employer? Should I comment on this during the interview?

This isn't usually a big deal at all.

Bring it up after you've got an offer, when you are coming up with a start date.

Many companies will let you borrow days against future accrued vacation time. Those that won't will usually let you take the days off unpaid.

I've done this many times for new workers on my team. It's never been much of a big deal if it's just a few days or weeks. If you are talking about one or more months, that could be problematic.

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