8

Let's say you interviewed at a company that you'd really like to work for but didn't get the job. From what I understand, it's a good idea to get in touch every now and then afterwards, to show that you're still interested in them and to jog their memory if they're thinking about further expansion. Let's assume that you're already tracking job listings there. Let's also assume that you have a non-HR contact, like someone you interviewed with previously.

What form should email sent, say, six months after the interview take? What do you say after reminding the person who you are? What topics do you address? Is it normal to ask about plans for further open positions?

An ideal answer would include a template for this kind of email message and a discussion of points to consider.

3

You say that you would like to know how things are going at the company, what problems do they have and if there is any way that you could help them with those issues. For example, I could see sending an e-mail that states something like:

"Hi, we met 6 months ago when I applied to work as a X and wonder if you'd be interested in meeting for a coffee or lunch. I'd like to hear about how the company is doing and if there is a way I could help.

Thanks,

JB"

While this may seem a bit creepy in some sense, there are people that like to have a network of people available and this is just the kind of touch point to have so that you're remembered by the person. Notice that I don't mention future opportunities here as what I want is a question or problem to solve that demonstrates my skills. What I'm trying to do is get to the point where they want me enough that the contact that isn't in HR will create the position for me.

0

This is the kind of letter I would send. (I will also assume a job with your skills is listed )

Dear Mr./Ms.{insertName},

I had the opportunity to be technically/{insertSpeciality} evaluated by you about 6 months ago. This opportunity never materialized {if You Want, include abstract like: since the joining period was shorter than the notice period I have to provide to my current employer}. I was browsing the career section on your company's website/{monster/website} and see {ref:jobListingNo.}that your organization is on the look out for a profile like mine. Would you please be able to guide me on how I can apply again ?

Yours is an organization that I have longed to work with. I will be highly obliged if you could please point me in the right direction.

Sincerely,
{insert Your name}

-3

Let's say you interviewed at a company that you'd really like to work for but didn't get the job. From what I understand, it's a good idea to get in touch every now and then afterwards, to show that you're still interested in them..

Have you ever heard the phrase: You don't get a second chance to make a first impression.?

If you were passed over for employment at a company, then the hiring manager likely had a good reason. This judgment will not change because you will not have a second opportunity to convince the hiring manager otherwise.

OTOH - If you narrowly missed employment, but still made a great first impression, then the company and/or hiring manager will remember you; and they will contact you if an opportunity becomes available.

Why will they remember you? Because Good help is hard to find. Moreover, if you interfaced with the company by way of a corporate recruiter, then the recruiter will remember you because performance and/or financial incentives motivate them to place candidates into jobs.


Keep in mind - One hiring manager's decision is not a popular referendum on your abilities. It just means that you weren't a good fit for this job at this point in time.

Emphasis: After a few years, you may improve your skills and apply for a different job with the same company or even the same job with the same company but with a different hiring manager.

For now though, it's probably not worth your while to ping the same hiring manager or same recruiter about other opportunities with the company. People are busy, and it's very presumptuous for you to expect them to "keep you in mind" when they already rejected you once. It's also enormously difficult to change someone's mind.

  • Sometimes you don't get a job because it's you, and for that case yeah, there's nothing you can do but move on. In other cases (I know because I've been on the hiring side here), the employer had multiple good candidates and, for whatever reason chose another. In those cases you can still have a future there. – Monica Cellio Jun 10 '13 at 17:46
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    it's very presumptuous for you to expect them to "keep you in mind" when they already rejected you once - We often interview several candidates. It seems good candidates come in groups sometimes. So we choose the one that we thing will best fit the immediate need, then call the others next time something becomes available. An nice email or phone call to the hiring manager might put at the top of that pile. – IDrinkandIKnowThings Jun 10 '13 at 19:57
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    @Chad: I'll concede - That's a good point. But I'd still say that it's better for the candidate to direct his/her efforts towards finding a job somewhere else. Even in your scenario, the candidate will still need to overcome the thought that he/she finished in second place. – Jim G. Jun 10 '13 at 20:04
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    Jim, I know two (two different companies), and have interviewed several "repeat" candidates (a year or two later). And I didn't realize I was unclear on this (for which I apologize): the question isn't about a general job hunt (where you go somewhere else instead) but about wanting to work at a particular company. In that case staying where you are and checking later, making no job change at all if it's not the one you want, can be viable. – Monica Cellio Jun 13 '13 at 22:17
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    @JimG. hear it is pretty common with Google too. – bharal Jun 14 '13 at 14:05

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