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I received an offer through email, detailing my start-date, salary etc. I replied back positively saying I was flattered to have received the offer, and I followed up with a question about relocation compensation. (I did not explicitly say "I accept the offer").

HR hasn't replied back in a week. I sent them a follow-up email a couple days back, but haven't heard back.

Is it safe to assume I've been ghosted and keep looking elsewhere? What should my next move be?

If it matters, the company is pretty big, ~ 8000 employees. The fact that it's big makes me think they would hold themselves to higher standards than abruptly ghosting a candidate, but who knows.

marked as duplicate by motosubatsu, gnat, gazzz0x2z, Michael Grubey, Jim G. Nov 27 '18 at 2:29

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    It's a bummer this happened. Email is a wonderful thing but often leads to lost opportunities. When you got the first positive email from them, you should have just physical gone there to discuss, or immediately phoned. Then you could firm up the concrete. Email is .. "nothing". As seen here, unfortunately. – Fattie Nov 22 '18 at 15:29
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As always in these situations - until you have a final, accepted, signed, formal offer in writing then keep looking.

For all you know, they could have decided that there's another candidate that wouldn't want this relocation compensation, so they might have offered her the job instead (and be waiting for her to get back to them before deciding how to reply to you.)

  • Yup, makes sense. Although I asked for relocation compensation, I made sure it did not sound like a deal breaker. "As you know I'm based in X and moving to Y would entail non-trivial relocation costs. I was wondering if I could have some information about relocation compensation in that regard"... – nz_21 Nov 22 '18 at 14:44
  • @nz_21 It may be that they're just slow at finding out that information of course. But you don't know that, so the only sensible option I can recommend is to play it safe and continue looking around. That way you don't get stung by trying to assume the best case scenario. (They could get stung by losing you because they didn't get back to promptly of course, but that's their own fault.) – berry120 Nov 22 '18 at 15:29

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