4
  • I got 5 months of internship in a company, then I got 3 months of probation period which will end at the end of this year.
  • Another guy got an internship along with me for the same task, got a probation period and is now hired full-time (his internship was shorter, as he was already at the last semester of college, one semester ahead of me).
  • The task is developing in a certain programming language that neither both of us nor most people heard of before (our boss gave us all the training).
  • Besides the two of us, there's three other experienced professionals with the same task, including the boss himself.
  • I currently work part-time in probation period 4 hours per day, 5 days per week, until I finish college. After that, I am supposed to work full-time too.
  • I'm not the best employee (I'm okay, but sometimes below average).
  • I don't intend to work there permanently, it's just a temporary source of income, as I aim working on profitable projects I have and starting my business, and I need time to work on it. So I'm not interested in having a career there, I just want as much money as I can get there, and my career will be my business.
  • It will still take a few years until I can quit my job. The free time I would have working full-time is too few (~4 hours) and that would make it take twice the years. I can't take that much time to get the business running.

Now considering all these facts, my question is how should I ask my boss to keep working part-time without making him think every day he sees me that he is paying a replaceable so-so employee uninterested in the company and with an "expiration date"... or even if it's a good idea to ask this to my boss in this situation.


Edit: Thanks for the answers, I came to the conclusion that it's not a good idea to ask to work part-time in my situation, that would be too risky and it would have negative consequences while I'm there, so I think I'll really have to work full-time and work on my project on my tight spare time.

  • 3
    What advantage would your employer get out of you working fewer hours? If the answer is "nothing", don't expect them to say "yes". – Philip Kendall Nov 24 '18 at 18:23
  • 1
    @PhilipKendall Hardly a part-time job benefits the employer, in most cases only the employee is benefited from fewer working hours. – Dewd Nov 24 '18 at 21:22
  • I know this is beside the question, but I'm really interested what programming language it is. Could you please tell us? – MadMike Nov 25 '18 at 8:58
  • "Thanks for the answers" - you are permitted (even encouraged) to upvote those who helped you ;-) You may also accept an answer, or even post your own and accept that. The idea is to give feedback, to help others who read questions in future. – Mawg Nov 26 '18 at 10:07
2

You might be able to convince them to let you work part-time a month or maybe, just maybe two after college because of personal reasons. After that your best bet is working around the clock or leaving your current job and working on your own business.

If you do tell them you want to work part-time because you want to start a business they will most likely replace you. They are looking to fill a full-time position long-term and you would be telling them you are a flight risk and not willing to work full-time.

0

The best way to ask if you can work part-time: "Would it be okay with you if I worked part-time and not full-time?" That's it. Don't offer anything else. That said, no matter what, once you are part-time, you will be considered "more replaceable" than a full-time, fully-committed worker.

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Inform your boss you'd like to study a new advanced programming degree. Thus, you won't have time for a full time position.

Convince your boss your new understanding will be beneficial to the company.

  • 7
    Lying is a terrible idea. – Glen Pierce Nov 25 '18 at 18:05

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