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I work at one of the most (if not the most) well-regarded companies on the planet, in terms of technical reputation as well as workplace benefits.

Orientation was great, and I was fully bought into the Kool-Aid, and I still am. I really do love this company from a mission standpoint.

However, I was saddened to see after starting "real work" that in many ways, it's still just another corporation; people aren't smiling and laughing and excited all the time and life isn't a perpetual party, but why shouldn't it be? In fact people look mostly bored, and caught up in their own personal rat race.

Relatedly, there just isn't the same amount of energy and friendliness as there was in the company-wide orientation, and the welcoming spirit is definitely missing.

I know I landed in a good organization and a great team. Most days I come home super excited and laughing and dancing, and immensely grateful. There are tons of great benefits, both material and cultural, large tangible details as well as small ones, that I notice all the time.

Is it just human nature to acclimate to your situation, no matter how good it is? If so, what can I do to keep things fresh and new, and keep myself grateful? How can I avoid any future resentment at any initial aloofness and natural distrust I feel I encounter from people (which would hinder me building up the trust and credibility that I feel we should generally give to each other as a matter of course)?

closed as off-topic by Dukeling, solarflare, Jim G., L.Dutch, gnat Nov 28 '18 at 10:51

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    I don’t understand the last paragraph at all or it’s relation with your original question. However, are you complaining that company which is technically one of the best in the world is not paying you to party perpetually and instead expecting you to work? – PagMax Nov 28 '18 at 2:38
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    Welcome to the corporate reality. As much as you have a great outlook when it comes to the workplace imo, it's still up to you if you let the contrasting outlooks of other people affect yours. – Noir Antares Nov 28 '18 at 3:00
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    If it were truly as good as the picture you're painting, would you consider paying them to be there instead of requiring payment to be there? If not, I believe you have your answer. – ESR Nov 28 '18 at 3:34
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“Is it just human nature to acclimate to your situation, no matter how good it is?”

Yes, everyone has a baseline level of happiness that they tend to return to a little while after a major change. (This concept is known in psychology as the hedonic treadmill.) Enjoy your honeymoon phase but keep in mind it probably won’t last forever.

“If so, what can I do to keep things fresh and new, and keep myself grateful?”

Keep developing new skills. Try and seek out interesting challenges wherever possible but also manage your expectations—any job is going to get repetitive and stressful at times no matter how much effort goes into employee satisfaction. Make sure to maintain a healthy work-life balance as well.

“How can I avoid any future resentment at any initial aloofness and natural distrust I feel I encounter from people (which would hinder me building up the trust and credibility that I feel we should generally give to each other as a matter of course)?”

I’m not exactly sure what you’re getting at here but you’re new to the company and your co-workers have probably had bad experiences with new hires in the past. Generally speaking, trust is something that has to be earned and I don’t think it’s wise to trust anyone inherently. Do your job to the best of your ability and they should warm up to you. (No need to be resentful.)

  • Thanks for the edit @solarflare. I was on my phone and forgot how to do block quotes. :-) – AffableAmbler Nov 29 '18 at 0:53
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Unless they're adding something to the water you'll find the majority of workplaces will feel similar after the novelty has worn off.

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