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My managers is cced in an email where my employer is recognizing my anniversary and the expectation was that the manager would forward it to the whole team. We might have actually gone for some celebration/party. But nothing happened as per my expectations.

Is it normal (not a concern)? This happened with me for the first time. I was congratulated by my manager/team, whenever I completed an year with my previous employers.

To clarify again, this question is not about employer, it's about manager/team.

closed as off-topic by gnat, Sascha, gazzz0x2z, Martin Tournoij, SliderBlackrose Dec 6 '18 at 20:26

  • This question does not appear to be about the workplace within the scope defined in the help center.
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  • 3
    Maybe your manager has other things to think about or the automated emails are on a folder he doesn't check. Did you mention it innocently during the coffee break ? – Answers_Seeker Nov 28 '18 at 11:06
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    Is this normal where you are from? I've never been congratulated nor do I see a reason to be – Twyxz Nov 28 '18 at 11:07
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    Do other people at this company get congratulations on their one year? It might just be that this company doesn't care much about it. – Erik Nov 28 '18 at 11:28
  • 5
    I have never, ever, seen anyone's "one year anniversary!" mentioned for any reason, at all, ever, having been involved in many businesses on every continent. – Fattie Nov 28 '18 at 11:52
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    For what it's worth, I work in IT in rural USA, and my supervisor buys cookies to celebrate the one-year anniversary of each new person on our team. Granted, we have a small team, and she's a great supervisor. IT is a competitive field, so doing simple/inexpensive things to make your employees feel appreciated or special isn't completely unheard of. Having said that, I wouldn't feel bad if things were different at my next job, but "At no other company on Earth" is a total exaggeration. – Keiki Nov 28 '18 at 13:22
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Companies that care about employees do this. In my view, it all comes down to company culture. The company I worked for, gave me a raise and pen. It was nice. I felt like they liked me and liked me work. I felt like I was now "one of them", because there's a sort of awkward "new guy" period. It's a useful way of including someone into the organization.

Forbes covers this a bit.

  1. Create A Welcoming Environment

New hires don't yet know the cultural norms at your organization. Hopefully this means they'll share lots of ideas, but sometimes people are quiet until they see how others behave. Make sure new talent knows you welcome input and you're excited to hear their point of view in meetings. To be successful, you have to socialize this within the organization, and over time it will become the new norm. -

Making people feel welcome with a small gesture goes a LONG way to making the company stronger. Not doing it, isn't ideal. So the answer to you question:

Why am I not congratulated on my first work-anniversary with my current employer by my manager?

Is likely the company culture doesn't include this idea OR the manager is busy and will get around to it.

  • I liked that "awkward "new guy" period" thing. It happens actually even when we have previous experience. My manager is not busy, he is just like the most people who have commented here, always ready to harass employees and when you ask them few questions they say that you are challenging my integrity. This equals to an harassment case. You might be terminated, blah, blah, blah. – Deepak Mishra Nov 28 '18 at 13:21
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    -1 "Companies that care about employees do this" implies "Companies that don't do this, don't care about a employees", which is laughable. – DonFusili Nov 28 '18 at 14:12
  • @DonFusili your logic is also laughable. If X->Y, that does not necessarily prove Not X ->Not Y. – Deepak Mishra Nov 28 '18 at 19:53
  • @DeepakMishra Indeed, but X -> Y does imply Not Y -> Not X. – DonFusili Nov 29 '18 at 8:05
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    @DeepakMishra The answer says "companies that care about employees" (X) "do this" (->Y). This is equivalent to "Companies that don't do this" (Not Y) "don't care about employees" (-> Not X). This is not the same as "Companies that don't care about employees" (Not X) "don't do this" (-> Not Y), which is what you want to hear. I'm sorry that this site is not the echo chamber/spin doctor you long for. – DonFusili Nov 29 '18 at 12:45
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Does it really matter if someone says "well done, the Earth is in approximately the same position relative to the Sun as when you started here"? Frankly, no - so don't make a fuss about it.

If a year's service means something actually concrete to you like improved employment rights, more leave, a pay rise or whatever then make sure that happens but don't worry about something which makes no real difference to anyone.

  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Snow Nov 29 '18 at 6:55
3

Not all companies mark work anniversaries and perhaps not all managers in companies that do mark them bother. I can't think of one I've worked for that's marked single years.

There have been a couple that have marked significant milestones like 5, 10 or 20 years, but even those have been the minority.

There are probably other reasons why your manager is informed that you've completed a year's service, these could include:

  • Your holiday entitlement might change.
  • Your employment status might have changed, e.g. from probationary employee to permanent.

Of course, the question of whether the first year anniversary should be acknowledged is a different question, and if other managers follow the "protocol" but yours doesn't then that reflects badly on them.

  • My managers is cced in an email where my employer is recognising my anniversary and the expectation is that the manager would forward it to the whole team. We might have actually gone for some celebration/party. I got confirmed six months ago. I know this is a small concern, but still it's strong enough to raise a question against their management skills. – Deepak Mishra Nov 28 '18 at 19:15
  • @Deepak, that detail was missing from your question which is why I answered as I did. – ChrisF Nov 28 '18 at 19:53
  • okay makes sense. – Deepak Mishra Nov 28 '18 at 19:56

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