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  • For 46 weeks of the year, there's lots of freelance and contract work

  • However, I find that right around now it's basically[2] hard to find any contracts or freelance work.

I find there's just not much there until about January 15.

Surprisingly this seems to be a worldwide phenomenon. Global new year!

Obviously all contractors/freelancers financially plan for this.

But, is there any specific tricks to find more works at this time of the year, which freelance/contractor software engineers have found?

I thought this might be an interesting question for the site, with broad application.


[2] it starts at about 2pm London time, on the Thursday before December!

closed as too broad by Fattie, Mister Positive, sf02, motosubatsu, JazzmanJim Feb 22 at 18:48

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Your question basically seems to boil down to "I'm having trouble finding freelance work near the holiday period". Add a concrete goal you want to address, and cut some irrelevant chatter: the intro "apology", the non-redominantly-Christian paragraph, the "note, relax! and! enjoy! your! self!" comment paragraph, and the "footnotes" part are unneeded. – Brandin Nov 29 '18 at 13:23
  • hi @Brandin ? If you're agitated about a certain writing style, use the edit button, or vote to close? – Fattie Nov 29 '18 at 15:39
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This is what any decent contractor will think and plan for.

Just assume that you'll be out of work for a month or so between contracts and budget accordingly.

It doesn't matter that this is the software industry, it doesn't matter that it's the end of the year. You just make the assumption that:

A) Your cushy contract isn't going to be extended at the end of the term
B) It's going to take a while to pick up a new contract
C) The rate for your new contract might not keep you in the lifestyle to which you've become accustomed

Budget, budget, budget.

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    ... and set your rate accordingly. This is why contractors have to charge a much higher hourly rate than salaried people in order to have approximately the same income. – Dan Pichelman Nov 29 '18 at 14:42
  • Due to all the angst and (bizarro) censorship on this harmless question, @snow I suggest you just delete the answer so I can delete the question to save everyone stress! – Fattie Nov 30 '18 at 3:49
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    -1 I don't think this is answering the question. It mentions boredom rather than finances. – Bwmat Nov 30 '18 at 8:19
  • It is incredibly not answering the question. I've already asked @snow to please delete it so I can just delete the Question, since it seems to be unpopular. – Fattie Dec 1 '18 at 4:08
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    Was a contractor for over a decade. This is just how it's done in all industries. You will be out of work sometimes and you set your rates and budget accordingly. – Cypher Jan 16 at 20:08

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