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A bit of context: I'm employed as a software developer at a moderately sized IT firm. In my freetime, I do freelance videography work. The internal marketing departement is quite small and only have basic knowledge about video content. I am now regularly asked for help and even shot a few event films for the company - my actual manager agreed to this, as the request came from higher up.

Current situation: The company now wants to release a recruiting video - produced, shot and edited by me with help of the marketing team. From multiple colleagues I now have heard, that my video work is really good and I should charge the company for this as I would when freelancing - or at least get some sort of bonus.

I really like the opportunity of exercising my "hobby" during worktime for my employer whilst getting paid for it (normal salary + expenses), but also like the idea of earning some extra money, since I'm saving the company the costs of hiring a film production company.

How and who would I best approach with this?

  • You could instead ask them to promote your freelance business which will be good for you in the long run. – Lifelong Scholar Dec 13 '18 at 13:02
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I really like the opportunity of exercising my "hobby" during worktime for my employer whilst getting paid for it (normal salary + expenses), but also like the idea of earning some extra money, since I'm saving the company the costs of hiring a film production company.

How and who would I best approach with this?

Don't mix the streams here.

Either do it on company time as part of your normal salary, or do it on your own (non-company time) and charge a reasonable rate.

If you are an established freelance videographer, I'd suggest that you treat this as just another professional gig. Charge your standard hourly (or project) fee. Do professional work on your own time, rather than on work time. Make sure you have a formal, signed contract for your work.

If you are not yet established, you might want to be a bit more casual about it. In this scenario you could just ask for expenses and not any additional hourly fee. You should also ask permission to use this work as part of your professional portfolio and ask for a formal testimonial (on your website, Facebook, Yelp, or whatever it is you use for testimonials) and referrals. This could be a great way to build your personal brand.

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If this is on company time, they already pay you to be there, I don't see how you could ask them for money. The company is already paying you, and while you are doing that, you are not doing any of your IT related duties.

If you are doing this outside of company hours, that changes things. Personally, I wouldn't charge them as "Timothy Gruntzner the freelancer" I would just say that if they want you to do this they either need to let you do it on company (in the office), or pay you overtime for the extra work you are putting in at home.

The company may not be allowed to cut a check to an external entity for this, but they can probably justify it by allowing it on company time or overtime.

IMO, if you asked be compensated as a freelancer, they will just hire a freelancer. As you said, they are saving money by using you as the resource. If they need to hire you a freelancer, they may as well hire whoever is the cheapest and carry on.

  • Exactly that was my initial thought as well. Nevertheless my colleagues tried to convince me that working on company time would not justify the creative energy going into this project. Having my point of view confirmed or not by others was the goal of my question. – timothy g. Dec 13 '18 at 12:58
  • I guess then it all boils down to whether you can get the higher ups (like your manager) to see it the same way? – Lifelong Scholar Dec 13 '18 at 13:02

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