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I have recently joined a new company in Estonia which is active in software development, and i have worked there for 1.5 month. I am in a trial period currently (which is 4 month).

I regret about my decision to join this company. The supervisor does not communicate clearly, and then criticizes with bad tone. As a result, I wish to leave the company, as soon as possible, since I am sure the problem is not fixabl.

I have read this, and i know, i should talk positively about my previous company. Also, I read this question, which advises to be honest with the next employer, and not hide previous experiences.

I would like to not hide it, but i am wondering how to justify it for the next employer? And probably, my current employer will not give me a positive recommendation.

One option would be:

  • When i joined my current company, it was my best option, but right now, i feel your company can be a better option for me, because the type of product which you develop is more suit to me.

How convincing is it?

What are the other options to explain it?

  • with little help from this site or google you will find answer withing minutes. – Saar Dec 24 '18 at 9:30
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It's still within probation, so it simply wasn't a good fit.

An interview process doesn't always work out perfectly - your new employer will be aware of that.

I would suggest to prepare questions to ask your future manager during the next interview to avoid this happening again. This also shows you've learned from this experience, are interested in having a better result this time, and in general, questions are good to have ready in interviews.

You could, for example, describe one of the situations you found yourself in at this job, and ask your manager how s/he would handle it.

Good luck finding a better job :)

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There is a reason you are changing your job. That's the justification.

Build up a list of the things that you shouldn't have had to endure, and then rewrite them again and again until you have the most polite (and forgiving) delivery of the incidents. Admit your shortcomings where they were applicable, and your realization that your efforts to repair them were not noticed. Then seriously consider throwing them all away by replacing them with a summary.

How you present this justification is important.

I joined my current company, it was my best option, but right now, i feel your company can be a better option for me, because the type of product which you develop is more suit to me

This is a horrible presentation of your justification to leave, it makes you seem fickle. You don't mention the real reasons, instead you said "I changed my mind". If asked, repling with

I will be leaving my current company because my manager attempts to motivate through insults and threats. I could stay there, but many others have left and I believe that at my current company, I have no upward or lateral path out of his team, as he doesn't recognize people for positive accomplishments. If you don't mind, I'd prefer focusing on the good I can offer you company, and I'd rather not talk about my current manager further.

And then never say another bad word about your employer. Focus on the good you can do (and be recognized for) elsewhere. If pressed, you have the memory of the events to fall back on, remembered in a way that doesn't paint you as a vindictive employee.

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    How you present the justification is indeed important, but throwing your manager under the bus is not how you should do it (even if they deserve to be). I would focus on the job not being what you expected (no need to go into deta why) and that there is no path for career advancement. – jpatokal Dec 25 '18 at 11:23
  • @jpatokal If the manager did the things mentioned, it's unpleasant, but not throwing the manager under the bus. It is a reporting of what happened. Now, if the manager didn't do these things, then of course it is not appropriate. My statement was an example of how to report a job gone wrong with detail, not exact words fro them to say because, I have no idea exactly what went wrong. – Edwin Buck Dec 26 '18 at 4:47
  • This is a job interview, not "reporting". It will not reflect well on you to badmouth your current manager, no matter how factual or justified doing so is. – jpatokal Dec 26 '18 at 8:59
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When i joined my current company, it was my best option, but right now, i feel your company can be a better option for me, because the type of product which you develop is more suit to me.

I would advice you not to say this. It's a sentence without sustenance and which you can use for any company you're interviewing. It does hint thought that you'd flee a company as soon as you get a better offer.

Just tell them that you were in the probation period, and that it was not working out. When probed, you may state a few things when it comes to you, but you should not put your previous company in a bad light -- a job interview is about you and the company you're interviewing with, it's not about your previous company. If pressed, say that you are a professional, and that you're not here to hang out the dirty laundry of another company.

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