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I'm currently working for a seemingly great company. However I don't really feel challenged, often bored with the work I get and sometimes even flat out don't have any work to do. Furthermore the operation and organisation in the company seems highly sloppy to me. I'm already planning on quitting this job in a few months in order to begin studying my masters degree.

Since I was little, I was told that a gap in my resume/cv is a really bad thing if I want to get hired, but how bad is it actually? Is quitting now, when I only have to do a few more months, worth the gap? Or is it best to just suck it up and stay until I start studying again?

I don't feel like I'd be able to get a new job for the time between now and the start of the new semester because I'll be moving when the semester starts.

Edit to clarify some things: Obviously the 2 years (atleast thats the time it should be in the best case scenario) I'm studying for my masters degree won't be an issue, since I was improving knowledge etc. and can provide the time I was there in the resume. I am more worried about the gap from now to the start of the semester. I'm also not worried about the money.

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    Never, ever, ever, ever quit without a new job - unless you don't actually need money. – Mawg says reinstate Monica Jan 4 at 7:52
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    @Mawg normally yes, but, if this relates to the go-go world of programming, in today's market it's really not a big deal just quit, assuming you're a skilled programmer. Indeed, the "next opportunity" loves it that you are "immediately available" and that you're so positive about your abilities you freed yourself touy aggressively find exactly the role you want. So ... that's kind of the exception. – Fattie Jan 4 at 11:57
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    I guess it depends - perm or contract. But even as a contractor, I can't always guarantee an immediate start, so don't jump ship until I have another to land on (YMMV). – Mawg says reinstate Monica Jan 4 at 12:32
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    My larger concern here would be that the gap followed by the Master's studies would look like you chose to return to school because you couldn't find employment after leaving your current job. Probably not a huge deal. But I don't understand why you wouldn't prefer a few months' additional pay. Is your job actively unpleasant, outside of being boring to you? – Upper_Case-Stop Harming Monica Jan 4 at 22:56
  • @Fattie generally agree in this case as OP doesn't worry about the money anyway; and yes in many Western places the market is very encouraging this, but I'd be careful with that generalised statement, it does depend on your location (or willingness to move) and skill level. We've recently rejected a couple candidates although we'd really need some new colleagues. Vice versa in some regions it's certainly not as easy even with good skill levels – Frank Hopkins Jan 21 at 18:28
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I did the same for the same reasons as in your first paragraph, quit the job and had a 4 month long break.

The break itself was great and preparing for interviews was also much easier this way, I could go on 2 interviews a day and prepare/practice a lot.

I have interviewed at 18 companies (which wouldn't have been possible if I was still working) and of course everyone asked about this break, I told them the truth that I wanted to take some time off from work and that's it. No more questions asked, wasn't an issue at all. There was only one interviewer who started to get suspicious and asked a few more questions but I still received an offer from them.

So long story short a short gap in your CV shouldn't be an issue.

In your case since you will be doing your masters after the gap they won't even ask about it in my opinion.

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If you're going to uni you won't have a gap on your CV if you put the dates you have studied on your resume. The 3 months when you quit is not a significant gap really. Employers may question it but unlikely to change the overall decision. You can put this time as "preparing for your masters".

I assume you're getting a degree to improve your knowledge and credibility.

From my knowledge it's not a gap in employment that is a cause for concern. It's the gap in which you've done nothing and there is no clear reason you have a 'gap' eg; I wanted to just take 2 years off. That obviously won't be shown in my CV but it's clear I've not been employed or doing anything for the past 2 years that furthers my career.

This being said I do recommend you just continue your job for a few more months. It's money at the end of the day which will help your university fees, give you some extra spending money and an extra 3 months of experience which you may or not be bored during but you never know.

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    Thanks for the answer. Since you're talking about the studying itself, I think I should clarify: Obviously the 2 years (atleast thats the time it should be in the best case scenario) I'm studying for my masters degree won't be an issue, since I was improving knowledge etc. and can provide the time I was there in the resume. I am more worried about the gap from now to the start of the semester. – Suimon Jan 4 at 7:52
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    If asked, you could always say that you quit to do some studying before the new semester. But, it is unlikely to be asked. I certainly wouldn't, if I were interviewing you – Mawg says reinstate Monica Jan 4 at 7:53
  • @Suimon Yes as mentioned, You can simply say you were studying/preparing and the gap is so little it's unlikely to even be asked about. It's not worth quitting for the sake of a few months but if you want to do it then it really won't affect you negatively very much/at all – Twyxz Jan 4 at 8:28
  • @Suimon Especially around the age where you are studying it is not uncommon to take a few months or a year off to travel the world or do some other insightful things like help out at an NGO, try a private project that could evolve into a startup etc. Those typically would be seen as a benefit rather than a negative. If it's just about having three months of holiday to slag off, that's not a pro in itself, but would barely be seen as a negative either. Some people looking for totally job focussed people might, but most won't care about such a short time when you had reasonable switch anyway. – Frank Hopkins Jan 21 at 18:20
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Since I was little, I was told that a gap in my resume/cv is a really bad thing if I want to get hired, but how bad is it actually?

It is never a bad thing. Candidates take a break owing to many reasons. The important question is how prepared are they to return to the industry after the gap? Have they updated their skill set? Are they aware of the technological advancements?

The candidate needs to be well versed with these things and show to the potential employer that they are not rusty; their willingness to learn needs to be highlighted.

There are many questions being asked here related to the same; and I have seen many users, here in Workplace SE, who have taken a break, anywhere from ~2yrs to ~10 years and have come back to the industry successfully.

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Since I was little, I was told that a gap in my resume/cv is a really bad thing if I want to get hired, but how bad is it actually? Is quitting now, when I only have to do a few more months, worth the gap? Or is it best to just suck it up and stay until I start studying again?

For general jobs, small gaps are not a huge issue. For US government jobs where you need a clearance, gaps bigger than 1 month in your work history are an issue. You need to be able to account for what you were doing during this gap and provide a reference to verify.

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I dont think its a bad thing at all. I was working for a company since beginning of August. In December I quitted my job and started in a new company. My answer to this question is: I didnt fell challenged.

Its happening again in this new company in my first month, and if it dont change I'll quit again. Its really difficult to like to work with nothing to do, with no challenges and nothing to learn.

It is what makes you dont want to wake up at morning.

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Especially around the age where you are studying it is not uncommon to take a few months or a year off to travel the world or do some other insightful things like help out at an NGO, try a private project that could evolve into a startup etc. Those typically would be seen as a benefit rather than a negative.

If it's just about having three months of holiday to slag off, that's not a pro in itself, but would barely be seen as a negative either. Some people looking for totally job focussed people might, if you put it that plainly, but most won't care about such a short time when you had reasonable switch anyway. Especially, since you studied afterwards and thus you getting out of the job and out of touch with your topic shouldn't be a concern either.

If you don't need the money, go for it. Better to start university well rested and ambitious than drained out.

(Do consider, depending on your location, that every month without salary also decreases your pension and you might make to work a little longer when you're older).

P.S. This applies to most Western countries, if you feel your country has a different economic culture, you should point out a general location.

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