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I recently got fired from my first job after working there for 6months and even being promoted. Im conflicted as to whether I should put this on my resume. My old manager had no problem being put down as a reference. I have a great work ethic, just think the job was too close to my house and I got a bad habit of leaving late.

  • Were you sacked after the first time, or give warnings? If you got warnings and still persisted, think long and hard about how you are going to convince someone to hire you - and not to fire you if you fall back into old habits. If your boss gives good references, then it might be OK - this time; not so much if you repeat your behaviour. – Mawg Jan 11 at 7:38
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    You are fired but your manager has no problem being used as a reference? This sounds weird. If I were you, I'd ask for a recommendation letter from your manager instead of mentioning him/her as a reference. Like this you are sure that (s)he will show some positive feedback (because you'll be reading the letter first before showing it to your next employer :-) ). – Dominique Jan 11 at 8:16
  • In some jobs, there are things that are automatic firing offenses, which the managers might consider not very important, so in a job like that it's easy to be fired while your manager retains a good opinion of you. A friend worked at a job that would fire him if he had unexcused tardiness twice in six months. A relative got fired, but was told he'd be hired back as soon as the rules permitted it. – David Thornley Jan 11 at 16:15
  • I'm not trying to personally attack you but I think you should also think a bit more on having a great work ethic. "I have a great work ethic" but you turned up consistently late. Be cautious on your resume or in an interview because a hiring manager might see the same contradiction I have here. – K Vaughan Jan 11 at 16:19
  • It depends on how you see it: if you understand that the most important in a job is the quality of the work given and/or the collaboration with other colleagues, you can probably include such experience if you think you were good at it. Punctuality is expected for your sector, though. So, if you add this line, you should explain what happened if asked... And commit to not make the same mistake twice -- independently whether you add this experience or not. I would recommend adding it and working towards being on time. – Kiddo Jan 11 at 18:36
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Yes.

If you omit that period of time, the interviewer will very likely ask you what you did during that time. If you lie, or otherwise decline to answer, that would typically be looked upon as a negative.

That said, they'll likely ask you why you were only there for 6 months. You should phrase the answer bluntly (you were fired for being tardy, and were tardy for ...reasons), and you can also use it as a segway to ask the interviewer what their policy on work hour flexibility is. Many companies nowadays offer a smaller 'core' set of hours and people are able to come in/leave when it suits them as long as they get the work done. Mostly it's simply being treated as an adult instead of a child. Companies that behave like the latter don't trust their employees and would likely micromanage you to intense frustration.

Either way, figuring out what they expect and letting them know your preferences is a good way for you both to determine whether it's a good fit.

  • Not downvoting, but the later part of the second paragraph is quite subjective. Companies can have very good reasons for wanting people in a certain place at a certain time. You're right that if you can't do this that indicates a bad fit, but that doesn't make it wrong, and this answer sounds a bit resentful. – ItWasLikeThatWhenIGotHere Jan 11 at 8:42
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    The OP specifically added a 'retail' tag to their question. I currently work in IT and am allowed to flex my time, but when I worked at a grocery store while in school it wasn't arbitrary or "treating me like a child" to expect that I had to be at my register during my scheduled hours. – Keiki Jan 11 at 13:38
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    I work in software development, so perhaps I'm a bit biased. You both raise valid points. Also the retail tag was not included on this post when I submitted this response. – Derek Jan 11 at 15:18
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If you are sure your manager will leave a good reference, then it should be ok.

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    If the issue does come up in an interview, make it clear you understand your mistake and have learned from it. – Patricia Shanahan Jan 11 at 2:14
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Dont offer any more information than you need to on your resume.

Dont have a resume that says:

ABC Company. Hired june 2018 - Fired dec 2018 for attendance issues

Acme Co. Hired Jan 2018 - Fired june 2018 for insubordination

just put the most basic info

ABC Company. june 2018 - dec 2018

Acme Co. Jan 2018 - june 2018

if a new interviewers asks why you left say something along the lines of:

Wasnt a good fit

Was looking for better opportunities

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