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This was my question that I had posted here.

Salary expectation and negotiation after a gap in career

I have been diligently preparing for the interviews, updating my skill set, been attending interviews and I received an offer a few days ago that met my expectations. The salary is neither sub par nor high; just what I had in mind.

I had sent my signed offer letter to them.

While I was attending the interviews, I had cleared all the rounds from four other companies; everywhere there was a positive feedback about me. Everyone released their (lucrative) offer letters. It happened after I signed the offer letter.

Here in India, the notice period is atleast 2-3 months and since I can join asap, I have more leverage over other candidates. Hence, the fact that I can join early and also the positive feedback that was given about me makes me a strong potential employee.

But, I have already signed the offer letter from one of these five companies. Here, work seems to be pretty interesting; Higher management is quite active and has high expectations from me as he had received good feedback about me. The tech stack is a notch above what I have been working on but nothing out of the box.

I have sent my rejection letters to the rest of the companies that I have accepted offer elsewhere and hence won't be able to join them; not for now, atleast.

I have a fair good idea about how my career path would be paved if I chose to work for any of these companies. I have listed the pros and cons of working at each of those and it seems to be almost the same and chose to go with the one where I had signed the offer letter.

Now, the higher ups of the other companies want to talk to me; either on phone or in person. I am pretty sure all these meetings are to retain me;

The question is:

If I choose to meet or talk to them, what should I talk about? The offers are equally good at all the five companies. What is missing in one is present in other and vice versa. But, there is a balance in every offer.

The post could be vague; kindly do not vote to close it. I really need to clear my mind on this.

  • @JoeStrazzere that seems like it should be an answer. – Ben Barden Jan 17 at 18:54
  • @JoeStrazzere A few of them are persistent about it; They could and would even offer me more than what I am receiving at present. – Rocky Fan Jan 17 at 18:54
  • @JoeStrazzere I am definitely going to put across what you have suggested. But, I am sure the higher management would do something or anything to retain me. I am taking all possibilities into consideration. – Rocky Fan Jan 17 at 18:57
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    Companies that are "willing to do whatever it takes" to retain a certain person often regret it, and the person ends up with unreasonably high performance expectations. And you'll be leaving a bad impression on the company who's offer you already accepted. There's a lot of risk in negotiating at this point in the process! Even if it seems like you've "won" you may regret it later. – dwizum Jan 17 at 19:22
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    Another way to think about this: Turn the situation around. Imagine if the employer who's offer you accepted came back to you and said, "Sorry, we found someone who will do the work for a little less money, so we don't actually want you after all, we're going to take them instead." – dwizum Jan 17 at 19:23
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As you have already signed an offer letter with one of the companies you need to let the others know that you are no longer available:

I am sorry, but I have already signed an offer and am not available to meet with you. Thank you for your interest.

There is no need to talk to them or meet them in person.

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The question is:

If I choose to meet or talk to them, what should I talk about? The offers are equally good at all the five companies. What is missing in one is present in other and vice versa. But, there is a balance in every offer.

The advice here is you shouldn't meet with them. I agree with that advice.

But if you decide to meet with them, pick one company and tell them you will be off the market in X days. Discuss with them what they need to do to exceed the current best offer. If they meet your demands then go with them. There is no need to meet with multiple companies. You want to conclude the negotiations fast before you have to start with the new company.

Before doing any of this make sure the paperwork you signed doesn't obligate you to paying them if you cancel the contract.

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