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I've been working as an expat for more than 4 years. Recently for family reasons we had to move to Europe, to a pretty conservative country.

Since moving here, I've been told that with my profile I wouldn't have any problems finding a "well paid" job. I updated my resume and started my job hunting however I got only 2 replies out of 40+ applications.

I asked few HR friends, who lives in this country, to check my resume and give me their feedbacks. All said it looks good enough to get at least an interview.

I would like to know if some of the bellow actions might increase the reply rate:

  • If I can remove my name from the CV when applying.

  • If I can use a "local" name on the CV when applying (this is kind of lying from day 1 but at this point ...)

  • Remove or keep my picture

I don't know if this is important, but I don't specify on the CV that I have a work permit for the country I'm in. I think that HR should assume that if I apply it means I'm able to work here ?

Another thing is, I don't speak the local language, however I only apply to job offers written in english and who require english as a language without specifying the local language as a requirement.

I can also post a link to my CV if needed.

EDIT:

  • I clearly state my address in the CV, so HR know that I'm currently living in the country

  • I have been applying to different offers even when I'm over-qualified just to get at least a reply

closed as too broad by Dukeling, BigMadAndy, JazzmanJim, sf02, gnat Jan 24 at 21:17

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Does the resume clearly show that you are currently in the country? For example, based on your current employment (if employed). If not, and you don't know how to do this, that might make for a good question, which I'd suggest asking in a separate question. Applying definitely doesn't automatically mean you already have a work permit. – Dukeling Jan 23 at 23:55
  • Are your HR friends in that country? If not (or even if they are), I'd suggest looking up resume-writing tips specific to that country online. – Dukeling Jan 23 at 23:57
  • The things you mention seem fairly minor (apart from the picture, perhaps). I imagine you'd have more luck focusing on things like what else you include in your application (a cover letter? In some countries they may also expect other documents), where you're actually applying (in terms of websites, companies and people), how closely your skills match the job requirements and the rest of the content of your resume (like the general format and how you describe jobs). But this seems a bit too broad for this site. – Dukeling Jan 24 at 0:05
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    If you are Asian, then adopting a Western first name is very common. Changing a French name to Bulgarian because you want to work there would probably be viewed differently. – Mawg Jan 24 at 8:50
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    A lot of this really depends on the country and the role you're applying for. In the Netherlands it's pretty common to have software engineers that do not speak Dutch. It's less accepted if you're applying for a customer-facing job (say, a waiter, or working in a shop, or technical support, etc.). In Italy you're pretty much guaranteed NOT to find a job unless you speak Italian, no matter what the role. – ChatterOne Jan 24 at 10:05
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If I can remove my name from the CV when applying.

No, you can not remove your name from a resume. You can but expect it to get thrown in the trash in every single job application.

If I can use a "local" name on the CV when applying (this is kind of lying from day 1 but at this point ...)

Definitely do not do this. I'm not sure but I would have to say that at some stage you would have to tell them your real name and then explain yourself. You can adopt a local first name, plenty of people do this, but again at some stage you will need to fill out tax/pay forms and tell them your real name. Absolutely avoid fabricating a first AND last name.

Remove or keep my picture

Pictures on resumes are always debatable. You could safely remove it. My personal opinion is they add nothing of value (unless you're applying for a job at Hooters).

Another thing is, I don't speak the local language, however I only apply to job offers written in english and who require english as a language without specifying the local language as a requirement.

This one is tricky, it is very probable the companies are expecting the job applications in the local language along with a comment stating you can speak English. It is probably not an invitation to apply and only speak in English.

I don't know if this is important, but I don't specify on the CV that I have a work permit for the country I'm in. I think that HR should assume that if I apply it means I'm able to work here ?

You should probably mention in your applications that you have a work permit so they don't think you're sitting 5000 miles away fishing for a company who will sponsor you.

These are all barriers for you to overcome, if you see yourself living in this country for the foreseeable future your primary focus should be to learn the language.

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    "Pictures on resumes are always debatable. You could safely remove it." - I imagine this is highly country dependent. – Dukeling Jan 23 at 23:49
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    @solarflare about the language. In my, very conservative country, if the offer in English have additional text written in English you should put it in in English. If it's not you can generally assume the offer is the first language check. – SZCZERZO KŁY Jan 24 at 8:52
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    @113408 Yes, if the full offer (so requirement, benefits, company introduction AND additional requirements [the ones set by law for example]) are written in English (or german or spanish or whatever) then the applicants don't need to speak local language. – SZCZERZO KŁY Jan 24 at 11:33
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    Polish is not that hard in terms of grammar - it's far more logicail and well built than my own french, for example. The hard part is to tell it (and hear it) properly. Some places in Poland might look for English-speaking only workers, but your best bet is to learn it anyways. – gazzz0x2z Jan 24 at 11:58
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    @113408 Żaden Problem :) In Poland put your work permit with the rest of your personal data (name, address, email address). Lack of it probably will result in companies being afraid of additional costs (flying you for interview, work permit and sponsorship) so that may be a reason they throw it away – SZCZERZO KŁY Jan 24 at 13:34

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