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EDIT:

TL;DR I had 100+ problems with my current company, esp due to horrible & inappropriate management.

For the sake of my well-being & mental health- I put in my 2 weeks.

Thank you to everyone who offered advice.

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    This seems heavily dependent on how easily you can find another job, your financial situation and how much this is affecting you. "Suck it up" would be bad advice if you're going to have a mental breakdown in a week, and "quit now" would be bad advice if you can live with the discomfort and quitting means ending up homeless in a few months. I imagine you're probably somewhere between those two, but we still can't really tell you what to do. – Bernhard Barker Jan 30 '19 at 18:03
  • Think about how you are going to explain an employment gap. "My manager made me uncomfortable" isn't the easiest thing to sell whereas "I'm currently employed but want a better job" is a very straightforward sales pitch. – P. Hopkinson Jan 30 '19 at 18:12
  • Before finding another job, do not. But let me tell you this, you would want to get fired instead of quitting, especially if in USA. Just saying. For more info, reply and many will tell you why. – Sandra K Jan 30 '19 at 19:58
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    Combined with @Dukeling's points, I suspect there is a fair amount of context missing between "inappropriate questions" and a company forcing legal to be involved. The answer probably changes if the "inappropriate questions" are, say, sexual harassment or if they're just pointless/ annoying but work related. Similarly, a manager watching where you are and what you're doing sounds like a perfectly reasonable thing but if it's "my manager is watching me in a way that makes the company call in the legal department" that may be a different issue. – Justin Cave Jan 30 '19 at 20:05
  • Usually you cannot get your manager removed that easily – Kilisi Jan 30 '19 at 20:49
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It is generally not advisable to quit a job before you have already accepted a written offer from another company. Besides the fact that you will be for an unknown amount of time without any income, some recruiters/interviewers/HR folks are biased for whatever reason against unemployed people.

Just suck it up until you find a new opportunity.

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  • Sometimes you get a fun bonus where they get sick of you and give you severance to get rid of you, right as you walk into the arms of another company that has already offered you employment. – Trevor Jan 30 '19 at 22:07
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It may be uncomfortable to line up a new job without one, supporting you in the meantime,

Ping HR regarding your transfer and stall any 1 on 1 s with your current boss for a few day / perhaps a week.

If no response will be given after your status request, depending on your location, i can suggest writing him up, and, according to your financial situation, ever quitting or going on personal leave of absence.

Mental health is the most important thing to millennial, and if you uncomfortable, something should be done

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  • @JoeStrazzere 1. Uncomfortable workplace environment fosters a mental stress, if not treated becomes an issue 2. "This is my first job out of college" (c) in most cases means millennial at 2019 – Strader Jan 31 '19 at 16:14
  • @JoeStrazzere Strange how you missed the topic name – Strader Jan 31 '19 at 19:02
  • @JoeStrazzere you funny, keep writing. – Strader Feb 1 '19 at 21:32
  • No, its you, please continue – Strader Feb 4 '19 at 15:31
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Do not quit. It's rarely a good idea to quit without another job offer.

Now is the time to keep your head down. You got yourself noticed by a lot of people that have been defending this manager. You're now seen as a trouble maker. They are likely actively looking for a reason to get rid of you. So play by their rules, pretend nothing is wrong, and start looking for a job. Everyone will know what's going on when you start calling in sick to go to interviews, or show up in suits.

And I strongly mean keep your head down. Even as simple as asking a question in a meeting that others jump on can get you dismissed. Just stay quiet, nod your head in agreement, and do exactly what your employment contract said to do. Any manager worth their salt will understand exactly what you are doing and respond appropriately.

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