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There is a company whose pay scale is much higher as compared to the rest of the companies in the country. I don't know what they pay a person of my experience level. I have seen the pay of fresher’s in this company and several years experienced and they are both much higher than other companies. However, they ask us to fill a form before the first technical interview which includes expected salary. If you leave it empty the interviewer tells you to fill it as it is his duty to get it fully filled before sending it to HR.

Now If I write a low salary I would be getting paid much below the standard salary for a person of my experience level in the company. If I write a large amount I am afraid it would reduce my chances of getting a job in the company. How should I find out what my salary should be before the interview?

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    Related – Dibstar Jul 2 '13 at 7:22
  • I considered merging this with the other post, but sometimes having a duplicate can make it even easier for others to search and find the answers. Since these posts are now linked, visitors will find all answers to this question. – jmort253 Jul 6 '13 at 19:13
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First of all I live in France, and mostly know how french companies work, but it may still apply to you.

Now If I write a low salary I would be getting paid much below the standard salary for a person of my experience level in the company.

That may not be true as many companies have a salary grid, so that employees with the same level of experience have approximately the same salary. Mostly big companies have this kind of system, at least for new employees.

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One place to root around is Bureau of Labor Statistics. This will give you some idea of what average pay rates are in your professional role. If you're interviewing with a company in the center of silicon valley, even though you're in nowheresville, quote a rate reflective of what someone there is making. Often the reason some companies pay extra well is because they want to move you to a high rent district.

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