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I been feeling very much ignored at work for a long time.

Often I only receive complaints and commands etc., without any sort of acknowledgement of the work I do or praise for my work.

I do realize this is all subjective, but I also see that people are taking work away from me that I am more than qualified and willing to do and that I have done for many years.

I am 60, so seeking a new job is not an option, but I have noticed that this is affecting my work and my motivation. I'm very introverted, and I'm also hard of hearing which makes things that much worse.

How can I reverse this? How can I go from being excluded to being included and more productive?

  • @Parkaboy Welcome to the Workplace! I'm sorry to hear you're feeling ignored at work. What kind of interaction are you looking to have with your coworkers? Do you want to feel more included in professional or personal conversations? – jcmack Feb 6 at 18:37
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    I am 60, so seeking a new job is not an option," - Why not? – Robert Dundon Feb 6 at 19:04
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    @RobertDundon Presumably because of age discrimination. – Tashus Feb 6 at 19:28
  • @RobertDundon It starts becoming a problem at 40, nobody wants old people – Richard U Feb 6 at 19:42
  • @RobertDundon While you do have a good point, it is more difficult after about age forty. I'm told this varies by career field. At 60 seeking a new job is still an option unless OP believes it isn't. – J. Chris Compton Feb 6 at 19:52
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I'm also hard of hearing which makes things that much worse.

I highly suggest you see an audiologist about this and look at getting some kind of hearing aid if you haven't already. People with hearing loss can feel cut off from others and withdraw. It will also increase your risk for dementia. Please get this looked at by a professional, it will make such a big difference to your life.

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    This is very important. To see an audiologist is a must whenever you start feeling you don't hear very well. People don't realize how much they start being alone because of that. Don't let yourself to be isolated of the world because of that. I'm 31 and i use hearing aids since i was 7, you learn how to live with them and they can really improve your social skills. – Sebastian Aguerre Feb 6 at 18:56
  • Great first question, and now great first answer! :) keep it up – DarkCygnus Feb 6 at 19:51
  • good answer. Welcome to TWP, by the way – Richard U Feb 6 at 20:30
  • hooray @singlemom ! BTW on these sites it's ideal to "tick" an answer (any answer) to questions you have asked, as, it gives you brownie points or some such, and enables you to ask more questions, etc etc – Fattie Feb 6 at 21:18
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It sounds like you're in a feedback loop. You're being ignored, so you're starting to withdraw, which makes it easier to ignore you.

To combat this, you need to draw some strength from your reserves and become more active and engage people. If they won't include you, include yourself. walk over and talk to people, take on more work, go to management and ASK for more work.

At the same time, you may want to see your doctor for a checkup. Make sure your blood sugar is okay and that you're not experiencing diabetes or any other medical conditions that could be affecting you.

You may also want to seek the help of a counselor, a good psychologist who deals with depression and geriatric issues.

so, this should be a two pronged approach:

  1. INITIATE CONTACT WITH COWORKERS AND ENGAGE THEM
  2. Rule out or treat any physiological or psychological issues that may be affecting you and/or contributing to your withdrawal
  • Sigh, all of the above are true to varying degrees, part of this is looking for someplace to talk to. Operationally, my building is not good for socializing, all the people I 'work with' are in a different building and it's not practical for me to go to their building. Why is it assumed by non-disabled people that we disabled people should make/do all the effort?? "Relationships" be they work or personal are 2-way things. But of course it's always my fault etc. :) Of course people should never have to bother to make any effort to say anything to me. :) There's always two sides to things. :) – Parkaboy Feb 6 at 18:52
  • Why diabetes in particular? Nothing I can see in their post indicates diabetes as a potential issue. – singlemom Feb 6 at 18:53
  • @Parkaboy Well, check out my profile. I've been to Hell and back so many times, I know the way blindfolded. We're friendly here, and willing to help – Richard U Feb 6 at 18:56
  • @singlemom diabetes can mimic symptoms of depression: I've had it for over 20 years now. It is one of the many things that could be causes the things he's experiencing. when addressing a problem like this, you want to address any physiological or psychological things that might contribute to the problem – Richard U Feb 6 at 18:57
  • I know I don't have diabetes. The diabetes/depression link is good to know. People here are sometimes so oblivious they would not even know anyone has any kinds of problems though, and none of them are trustworthy, gossip is a major pastime in rural companies. It's been good to at least vent a little. – Parkaboy Feb 6 at 19:31

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