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I recently joined this new job, fresh out of college, so basically I have zero knowledge about how the corporate world works.

I have been in this project where I have a developer role, and I'll slowly mold myself into it all.

But the real question is, I have been waiting too long for some real work or some tasks. All I have been doing is sitting idle or going through KT (Knowledge Transfer) videos. There has been almost zero help from my colleagues or manager, who expect me to know it all by myself (As in how to behave, how to ask for help or work).

Also what adds to the problem is that I'm an introvert. How do I ask for help or get started with something that would eventually help me starting from the basics. As said earlier, I have zero experience of the life at jobs.

  • How long is "too long"? I just wanted to say that i had to wait weeks or even months in the two different software developments jobs i had to start doing "real work". Don't panic, but start trying to help somebody and/or talking to your manager. Even if you just watch other people working you will learn something. – Sebastian Aguerre Feb 8 at 12:12
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It should be "simple". Discuss with your boss, tell him what you feel, ask him about his expectations. Ask him which of the colleagues are more suited to provide you with some support.

Be friendly to colleagues in general. Try to create "bonds", make some friends. Ask your colleagues too.

NOTE: it is much better if you have specific questions. Go through a training material, write down things you do not understand (make also a note where the source of the question is, so you can show it to your colleagues).

If you just ask: "Please explain me XZ topic" which is in the training material, they will consider you to be lazy, or not interested, not involved...

The more specific, the better.

Another NOTE: do not sit idle, they will notice. Do your best to be "productive" (if your work is to learn, then you are productive if you actually learn).

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Also what adds to the problem is that I'm an introvert.

This does not help you, you already know that. Don't use that as excuse, please.

As said earlier, I have zero experience of the life at jobs.

At some point of time, every single one of us were at that stage. Don't panic.

i have been waiting too long for some real work or some tasks

It's not too long, it's just the time needed for the team and manager to have the confidence on you to be able to understand, work and deliver the expected outputs from you - so be patient and work on the activities given to you, through which they will be able to measure your capabilities and competency.

All I have been doing is sitting idle or going through KT (Knowledge Transfer) videos

There are differences. The KT videos are given so that

  • You get to know the context
  • You can understand the basics
  • You can come up with questions and most importantly,
  • You can grow interest in the work.

These are the things you absolutely need to do before you start on the "expected" real work.

There has been almost zero help from my colleagues or manager, who expect me to know it all by myself (As in how to behave, how to ask for help or work).

How do you know? Did you try asking for help and they refused you? Believe me, nobody expects anybody to know everything by themselves, but you got to ask. And, ask in a way that is answerable : not like "Can you explain how Linux works?" - that is a question for a college semester course, not something your college or mentor would like to or willing to answer. Help them to help you.

What I'd suggest:

  1. Complete the KT sessions (they are not for "formality", they are the stepping stones).
  2. Write down the questions / confusions/ clarifications you need to understand the project / assignments / topics in a better way. Try to google some of the questions, and note down the research you have done. If you get the answers, fine. If you don't it's also fine - you can still show your research effort.
  3. Approach your mentor / lead / manager and ask them for help. If you show signs of efforts from your side, I'm sure they will also be willing to help you out.

Note: If you're sitting idle without completing the tasks assigned to you (yes, completing KTs is a task) then there is a problem, mostly from your side - are you sure you like the work you are doing and/or about to do?

  • 1
    +1 Just to add, "how to ask for help or work". Nobody should feel the need to teach you this, it's rather a silly question. Just ask. – Twyxz Feb 8 at 7:39
  • Although I agree your your points, I think it's a bit unwelcoming and careless from their side too. I finished KTs, went through a code walk of whole application which lasted about only half an hour (Where someone explains me the whole code). Asked a doubt in code, he replied idk, has been there from before so it works. I'm staring to think i got the wrong job/workplace for me. – Uday Feb 8 at 9:20
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Also what adds to the problem is that I'm an introvert

From an introvert to another, I can tell you this is a bad excuse. If you have gone through college and finally made it to the working market and you still are COMPLETELY an introvert then that is a problem. I noticed I had problems with this when I was younger and worked on it myself. Actually during interviews when I am asked my weakness this is mostly what I use, as I give the example of what I've done to improve it. In my case, it was performing street magic. In your case can be as simple as joining in a conversation during lunch. You need to fit in as you will be spending 1/3 of your life with those people from now on...

There has been almost zero help from my colleagues or manager, who expect me to know it all by myself (As in how to behave, how to ask for help or work).

You are the new guy here. They all know their systems, what their code looks like, their shortcomings and maybe even industry jargon if this is a dev team for a specific market. It's like when I visited Germany and almost got ran over by a bike in the bike lane and the German guy shouted abuse at me. People will undoubtedly expect you to know, but this is out of pure habit. Don't be afraid to ask questions.

As said earlier, i have zero experience of the life at jobs.

We've all been there. Secret: They've been there too!

But the real question is, i have been waiting too long for some real work or some tasks.

I started working where I am 3 months ago (nearly) and as a business project manager I was hired to improve all the processes and services. I am instead coding automation for my department. Problem? I'm still waiting for licenses to be paid for software I need to use, so technically I can go through 2/3 days coding and 7 days of....stack overflow, youtube tutorials, udemy,codeacademy....it is boring yes...sometimes that will happen, being in the IT industry there is one thing that can happen: As a dev this won't apply as much but it will definitely apply as an app support analyst (my previous role).

You are only needed when things go wrong.

This CAN happen as well to you, but not as often. It is normal to have some downtime at work sometimes. This is where the introvert part needs to disappear. You can pick up work from another college, or simply just check their code, you may find new things and learn new things.

Most importantly, ENJOY! You are now earning some money...find something to invest it in before you learn to waste it...set yourself some achievable career goals and set yourself your next career step and go for it!

  • The street magic story is excellent. – Fattie Feb 8 at 11:36
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    @Fattie during an interview if I am asked my greatest weakness I answer "I used to struggle with public speaking, so what I've done to improve in it was to use one of my hobbies, illusionism, to get better at it. After performing street magic for a while I am now a bit more confident at it" – fireshark519 Feb 8 at 11:42
  • To actually take on and work on one's weaknesses is the secret to life. (Certainly to mine!) – Fattie Feb 8 at 11:58
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There is an idea (not so sure how popular it is still), that new intake should be given time to come up to speed with the 'corporate environment' and not given too much real work to do in the weeks after they join. So it may be that the way you are being managed is intentional.

If you feel you are not being given enough real tasks, ask for something. Bear in mind that you may well be given something that simply duplicates a more experienced person's work - so you should be looking more for an opportunity to learn the systems that you will be working with rather than generating productive results from day one.

Also bear in mind that the cost to the team of introducing you to the actual work may seem significant to them, so you may get on better if you can manage to limit your demands for time, and be more 'self-starting'. This assumes that this is the approach that you want to achieve, otherwise you need to just wait for the induction program to carry you along.

Try hard not to get used to this 'idle' state, but it should not last too long.

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I have been facing the exact same situation as you. I've been here at this new company for almost one month an a half, working as a junior developer. I've been mostly "idle" within the last 15 days i think. My boss went on vacations and left me a "task", poorly detailed, as if i already was a mid-developer. I've been working on it for over a week. Today i have (i hope so) finaly finished it. I handed the changes to my "mentor" wich is kind of a senior developer, and he seemed not giving a dammn about it... Most of my colleagues also behave as if i knew everything (some are more attentive). Right now i don't feel like studying. Maybe after lunch... But that's it! Studying is all i have to in a daily basis.

NOTE: I'm introverted either. But do not let this raise constraints around you. Adress your colleagues politely, but also confidently. Plan your questions.

Be yourself. Don't do anything to please the others if that makes you feel awkward or if it makes you feel unconfortable.

Theres a huge diference between being friendly and being with people wich you prefer not being with, just because you need to "make friends" at the office. Either people should appreciate introverts the way they are, or the company is not for you.

  • "or if it makes you feel uncomfortable." There will be times that the burden is on you to overcome your discomfort instead of them adjusting to you being an introvert. For example, as in introvert, you may be uncomfortable presenting your work to more than 1 or 2 people at a time,but if your boss needs you to present some piece of work to the whole department, you will need to do that – cdkMoose Feb 8 at 18:24
  • @cdkMoose You're not getting it... I've wrote that based on a context when it comes to pleasing people just for (e.g) making them accept you. I'm not talking about getting things done. If you got a job, you better do it. That's why you get paid for. But when, despite being 100% professional, you have to fit a mold wich was not meant for you or suck up to somebody, that's wrong. – wes85melis Feb 8 at 18:56
  • Then you should specify that context. I’ve had someone refuse a task because they were “shy”. If your answer depends on a context we can’t intuit that – cdkMoose Feb 8 at 18:58
  • @cdkMoose Well, i've wrote: "NOTE: I'm introverted either. But do not let this raise constraints around you. Adress your colleagues politely, but also confidently. Plan your questions." Seems quite self-explanatory. Anyway, thanks for the tip. Regards – wes85melis Feb 8 at 19:08

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