8

I have been working at my company (in the UK) for over a year but less than 24 months and I understand this affects my current rights regarding being made redundant.

Lately I've gotten the impression that the department I work in at my company may no longer be desired and the team may well be made redundant at some point in the near future. There's a level of unease involved for me there but these things happen. I was reading this question: Is there anything wrong with asking about job security? which indicates that directly asking the company about job security is not really a viable option (they would just lie).

I find myself in a difficult situation. I don't mind where I work currently and I'm paid reasonably, so in an ideal world I would remain here. My notice period is 2 months so there is a reasonable amount of time to find a new job should I be made redundant.

however I was made redundant from my previous job as well after being there for only a year (I was a solo developer on a project and they decided cobbling off the shelf solutions together would be cheaper per-annum than my salary).

I worry that being made redundant twice in two years is going to look very bad on my CV- so I've brushed it up and started looking for another job to try and get out before being made redundant. Is that a good idea? Or is it better to wait for the axe if I don't mind the work in the meantime? The issue with that is that if I'm wrong, then I could be burning bridges because the company project I'm on would be significantly hindered without me and I'd be leaving a job I don't hate for one I potentially could.

  • One problem for companies in this situation is that if they are thinking of reducing numbers but not closing down the entire function, rumours start spreading and everyone quietly looks around for alternative jobs. Sticking it out until a final decision is made and announced not only demonstrates loyalty to the company, you may be pleasantly surprised - in that enough colleagues effectively volunteer to go leaving more opportunity for you. – Julia Hayward Feb 12 at 8:24
  • For what it's worth, I think you took the wrong takeaway from the question you reference at the beginning. If you are truly concerned about the future of your department and your job security in general then you really should talk to your manager. They might not be able to give you specifics but you should be able to glean from a conversation whether it is only in your head or whether there is something truly to be worried about. – DanK Feb 12 at 19:37
14

I worry that being made redundant twice in two years is going to look very bad on my CV

Not exactly.

First of all, usually you don't put the reason for shift in the CV, that just describes your experiences and capabilities.

Secondly, if asked, you can mention the exact same thing you put in the question, preference to off-the-shelf solutions for budgetary purpose. The decision was taken by the organization, not by you. You are not let go because of your performance, nothing to worry about that.

I don't mind where I work currently and I'm paid reasonably, so in an ideal world I would remain here. My notice period is 2 months so there is a reasonable amount of time to find a new job should I be made redundant.

Well, I say that's reason enough to continue as of now, from your point of view.

Since you know you're into a risk-zone, please brush up your resume and keep an watch for the market. Being prepared may reduce the time spent unemployed and increase chances of finding a better next role, should your fears turn out to be real.

  • @NeilSlater right, absolutely. Let me mention that as part of the answer itself. – Sourav Ghosh Feb 12 at 9:30
10

If you think you're going to be let go by your current employer, start looking for a new job now. Don't hand in your resignation until you've found an offer. You can't be certain you'll find something good within your notice period, and shouldn't risk being out of work entirely if you don't. Being laid off because your job function is being reorganized/etc away isn't your fault and won't reflect badly on you, and by waiting for them pull the plug while you look you preserve any severance benefits you'd otherwise give up by just quitting.

1

Best not to jump to conclusions. Yes, it's a good idea to check out the market, and you might even find a job that is better than your current one. But leaving because you think there might be layoffs is not clever.

In general, you are legally better off if you get laid off. You will not get anything if you leave by yourself. I actually had a case where a company laid off a large part of their employees, and someone who put in his notice one week before the announcement got nothing where others got a five digit sum.

0

I've brushed it up and started looking for another job to try and get out before being made redundant. Is that a good idea? Or is it better to wait for the axe if I don't mind the work in the meantime.

It's always a good idea to keep a up-to-date resume handy regardless.

My first thought is you should stick with your current role, if you like it. If your job is fragile then switching to a new place might make things worse if you get canned there as well.

Also there comes the question of getting severance pay if you are made redundant and laid off. In your last job did you get a good severance pay before you were let go? If so, I'd wait it out unless you are in a comfortable position financially to take the hit.

As always be mindful. Browse the job board and see what is out there. Just casually look around and you got plenty of time.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.