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so I had my Facebook PE internship interview yesterday.

There were two rounds, one was system interview and another was programming round.

In systems round I have mostly never dealt with server and sysAdmin part so I directly told the interviewer when a question I didn't know, popped up. Other than that I think I answered almost all questions related to kernel and internal Linux processes right.

In programming round I continually spoke about the code I was writing and also wrote code taking care of the edge cases and everything in first question.

Second question was about a game named battleship, which I asked many questions with the interviewer because I have never played that game and didn't know much about it.

I wrote code and then as the time was almost out, discussed ways to improve the efficiency, with the interviewer.

I am confused, how I actually did in the interview and I really want to get this internship.

How do you think my interview went? How many people from such interviews are selected?

I would appreciate any advice and help.

closed as primarily opinion-based by corsiKa, Justin Cave, solarflare, gnat, jcmack Feb 15 at 7:21

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    There's not near enough information to really tell you how it went. I do hope you get it, and if you didn't know the game going in, hopefully the interviewer recognized that. But really, this isn't an answerable question until they let you know themselves. Best of luck!! Oh, and no matter how good or bad you did, keep looking. Never bank on a single lead! – corsiKa Feb 15 at 3:37
  • Fun fact: I interview people as a non-trivial portion of my job, so I'm pretty well-versed in what interviewers are looking for. And yet I have almost 0 ability to evaluate myself after I've gone through an interview. And the reason is that as the interviewer, I am taking everything in, taking notes, etc. So after the fact, I can go back and review everything, and form my decision from there. As the interviewee, I remember the broad strokes, but that's it. And that's not enough to know what the outcome might be. So now imagine the difficulty when someone else tells you what they remember :) – dlev Feb 21 at 7:21
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You might find this hard to believe, but interviewing is so subjective that you can't always know if an interview went well or poorly, even if you were paying really good attention to everything while being interviewed.

Got the answers wrong? Maybe the interviewer liked your approach, and will rationalize that with a little more time you would have eventually gotten them right. Got the answers right? Maybe the interviewer would indicate that you're already too advanced for the position, and they will decide that you will not be happy with the job (even though you are working hard to secure it).

Of course, there are also the times where wrong answers disqualify, and right ones support a hiring decision.

So, understand that you probably could have done better, and strive to do better next time; but, don't think for a moment that your performance has a controlling factor over whether you land the job. It's someone else's assessment of your performance, and you're not assured an assessment that aligns with yours.

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The answer is: We cannot answer, you have to wait to hear back from the organization.

The performance which is acceptable to someone may be completely irrelevant for someone else and there is no "universally accepted benchmark" for selection (or rejection). So, up to a large context, this depends on your interviewer.

Oddly enough, sometimes the selection / rejection also depends on the nature of the job (level of optimization, security etc..) so the same level of performance for two ore more post cannot guarantee the same results.

Wish you best of luck, but then again, you'll get to hear the final result from the interviewer / organization. Whatever we say or discuss here, is likely not going to make any difference.

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