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I work as a software engineer in the US and planned to give notice this Friday because we get our bonuses that day and I don't want to give them the chance to fire me beforehand. Friday ended up falling on a day off due to a night long monitoring the night before that I have to take part in.

Do I send an email on Friday afternoon with my resignation, or do I give them less time but do it on Monday while I'm in the office?

I've only quit one job and that was in very different circumstances so I'm not sure of the best way to keep my reputation in tact here. Either way I'm starting my new job on Monday in two weeks.

marked as duplicate by David K, gnat, The Wandering Dev Manager, LP154, Dmitry Grigoryev Mar 1 at 14:12

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  • Is it going to make a big difference to your world if you resign on Monday? If the answer is "no", you know what to do here. – Philip Kendall Feb 28 at 15:46
  • Just not sure if that's less than two weeks and would offend my/any employers – b15 Feb 28 at 15:48
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    If you work in software its likely that by friday afternoon less people will be in the office anyway. Friday afternoon - Monday Morning is not that much of a difference – Uciebila Feb 28 at 15:52
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Do I send an email on Friday afternoon with my resignation or do I give them less time but do it on Monday while I'm in the office?

You resign in person on Monday morning. That's the professional way to resign. And you tell them that your last day will be a week from Friday.

You are still giving them two week's notice. It includes that Monday, the rest of the week, and the rest of the following week.

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    +1. I've said this elsewhere (possibly even earlier today), but do what's best for YOU, not your employer. – Justin Feb 28 at 16:11
  • @Justin, yes - as long as you aren't kicking your employer in the face on the way out the door. It's a small world, there's no point in burning bridges. – dwizum Feb 28 at 18:04
  • Bring a printed, dated, and signed resignation notice with you. After delivering it in person, email the person the same message with a CC to your HR department. – J. Chris Compton Feb 28 at 21:45
  • @JoeStrazzere I suppose you're correct that a printed letter isn't needed. I consider it proper, but that doesn't mean others do. It has the added benefit of allowing you to resign by handing it to them and you don't have to say the right words - they're already on the paper. The last time I resigned my letter was maybe four sentences: 1 I got a better job offer, 2 it is a great opportunity because x, 3 it has been wonderful working with you, 4 I will miss it and value the time I was here. – J. Chris Compton Mar 1 at 3:20
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As long as you are within your notice period I don't think it makes too much of a difference. Most offices will tend to be emptier on Friday afternoon, so there is a chance no one will be there to see it, or do any action from it anyway.

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I'm not sure why you specifically want to resign on Friday but I wouldn't do it by mail.

I'd prepare a mail, sure, declaring my resignation in clear and objective terms. But first I would go and discuss with my boss/superior to explain to him that I plan to leave and why.

The "why" is not mandatory, it will depends on your relation with your boss and the actual reasons ("I'm leaving because I don't like you" is not something you'll want to share).

At the end of the meeting you'll inform your boss that you will send him a mail to officially start the process (notice period and all).

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