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As per the title, I had a really tough time working with my boss and have issues with them. Both personally and professionally. Thus, I have decided to resign after only working a few months here despite the extremely good salary.

Now, my other colleagues (not my direct teammates, who knew the reason immediately as they also hate our manager) have asked why I have decided to resign so quickly.

Should I tell them the truth? I'm worried this might somehow further hurt my teammates' relationship with my boss or cause office gossip to spread like wildfire. Although I have issues with my boss, they don't deserve the treatment of the whole department talking behind their back. My boss was newly appointed so I kind of sympathise with them not being experienced in being a manager.

Should I lie with something like I don't find the job scope interesting? What should I do?

closed as primarily opinion-based by solarflare, gnat, OldPadawan, gazzz0x2z, JazzmanJim Mar 6 at 15:52

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Not that it should encourage you to tell them the truth, but if they're reaching out to you like this, there is a fair chance they already know/suspect the truth. – user34587 Mar 6 at 8:02
  • It's none of their business. They may find out through the rumor mill anyway, but you are in no way obliged to answer the question. "I'm looking for a change" is always a good evasive answer – Hilmar Mar 6 at 13:31
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You don't need to lie, just say you found a better opportunity. You don't have to give any reason why you don't like your current job.

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    @virolino your edit to my answer was rude if you want to answer the question feel free to but don't add your opinion to my answer – Pixelomo Mar 6 at 6:55
  • Sorry, I was trying to help. No offense intended. – virolino Mar 6 at 6:56
  • cool, no worries, edits are for improving spelling, grammar or otherwise making an answer more clear. In this instance I don't think an edit was needed. – Pixelomo Mar 6 at 6:57
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    I like this - simple and concise. – Justin Mar 6 at 8:50
  • The problem with the "better opportunity" answer is that anyone with half a clue understands that people don't leave jobs for something worse, which makes it code for "this place sucks and I want out." Someone wanting out three months in is usually an indicator that something's wrong. – Blrfl Mar 6 at 12:14
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I think its better to not tell the reason as it might create pre-concieved opinion about the manager and everyone might avoid working under him/her. Let them have their own experience and decide for themselves.

You can tell the job didn't worked out for you. If the manager is bad then sooner or later everyone is going to get to know this anyway.

Edit:

Reiterating what I said in the comments below about the fact that manager is new and hated by the team working under him/her.

@virolino The answer should take into account about the fact that manager is new. If the entire team hates the manager sooner or later he/she is going to be fired anyway and if OP has accepted the new job there is no point in discussing the employment at current company. Best for OP is to move on.

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    Don’t know why this was downvoted. It answered the question and gave reasons. – Damila Mar 6 at 5:24
  • @Damila - Because it's a bad response? – dwjohnston Mar 6 at 5:38
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    @dwjohnston Can you please explain how it's a bad response? – noob Mar 6 at 5:39
  • Because the least of OP's worries is the reputation of the bad boss. That is why it is a bad answer. Also, "pre-concieved" is not a good word to be associated with what happens AFTER the bad experience. – virolino Mar 6 at 6:26
  • So if OP doesn't cares about managers reputation it's justified to tell everyone about your experience with a person and jeopardize their career irrespective how others might feel about working under him? OP found a new job and doesn't have any incentive in explaining the reason behind quitting. – noob Mar 6 at 6:29
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As per the title, I had a really tough time working with my boss and have issues with him/her. Both personally and professionally. Thus, I have decided to resign after only working a few months here despite the extremely good salary.

Personal issues -> I will assume it happened in the workplace and not outside.

Not my direct teammates, who knew the reason immediately as they also hate our manager

-> if everybody in your team "Hate" (which is strong word) the manager, it is likely that a lot of people in the company are aware of this.

I'm worried this might somehow further hurt my teammates' relationship with my boss

-> I don't see why you leaving because of a bad relationship will affect the relationship of others.

or cause office gossip to spread like wildfire.

-> Everybody gossips in office, it is normal.

It seems you already answer the question yourself :

My boss was newly appointed so I kind of empathise with him/her not being experienced in being a manager.

-> just reply the Truth : "it seems that my manager is new on the job, and we didn't 'click' because of the working ways he follows, so I decided to find another job where I can more in synch with my direct manager"

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