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I've been at my full-time position (software developer) for almost an year now, as a college hire. I started at the same time with another college hire, with the same title.

Naturally, we both started with maintenance tasks on the product. A couple months in, I'm assigned to work on a massive product refresh, on a software stack only I know, with little to no supervision.

Aforementioned colleague was delegated company specific training, customer travel, conference attendances/presentations, and professional certifications. Other, more senior colleagues are delegated these tasks as well.

The situation has not changed. I am being delegated much less maintenance tasks, even when asking for priorities every now and then. I've received a pay raise and merit rewards for the development of the product refresh, but I feel I am otherwise making very little impact to our company.

My question is motivated by my feelings that I am being made obsolete due to my lack of diverse tasks like my colleague - am I being made obsolete? Is this just a specialization of workers, common among teams of about 10 programmers? (I haven't worked in a large team like this before). Maybe I am just feeling jealousy? Should I simply not worry about it and keep coding on?

What can I do to prevent feeling that I am not contributing enough to the company?

  • Your post only contains questions related to feelings and feelings-management. These are off-topic on this site. Please edit the question and be more specific - what you need, with regard to your situation at your job. – virolino Mar 13 at 12:26
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My question is motivated by my feelings that I am being made obsolete due to my lack of diverse tasks like my colleague - am I being made obsolete? Is this just a specialization of workers, common among teams of about 10 programmers? (I haven't worked in a large team like this before). Maybe I am just feeling jealousy? Should I simply not worry about it and keep coding on?

My opinion is that there's no point in giving pay raise and merit rewards for people that will be soon be rendered obsolete. Don't work like you're going to replaced, because, in that mindset, you won't make the best long term decisions.

You've mentioned some of the opportunities other members of your team have had, but what is that you want more of exactly? Take some time to ponder this and don't compare yourself to others. Figure out what you want for yourself. Do you want more external interaction across teams? Do you want to build your skills in a particular tech stack? Certification? Etc. After you've decided talk with your manager about your growth trajectory and plan goals, baby steps, to achieve that growth.

  • Thanks for your answer @jcmack. I've realized much of my concern is something to discuss with my manager about. I do enjoy sitting there and coding since that's my comfort zone and I've voiced that to my manager before - but I think I'm ready for more. Don't compare yourself to others this resonates big - thanks again. – chakeda Mar 13 at 0:23

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