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I interviewed for a role recently and wasn't selected in the end, probably due to the fact that I was interviewed for the wrong role.

The details of the botched process can be found here.

The company had initially expressed interest to reimburse the travel expenses. As I was wary about it, I used the cheapest trains to get there. It amounts to £27.

Quite recently the company replied to my followup email saying that 'they have gone ahead with other candidates'. I asked them whether they could reimburse the travel expenses as initially agreed & they said 'they would be happy to'.

I haven't send the receipts to them , so they don't know the amount.

My question is: would it seem petty to ask them to reimburse this small amount?

NB: £25 Can buy you a 3 course meal in the UK. So I guess its not a petty amount. Its relative I guess.

17

Since you asked if they would reimburse the expenses as initially agreed upon, and they stated that "they would be happy to", I don't think it would seem petty. In fact, it could be perceived as odd if you did not send in any receipts after agreeing upon reimbursement with them.

If you had requested reimbursement without any prior discussion, then there's a chance that could be perceived as petty, but that's not the situation you have described.

  • 2
    +1 for this, but RichardU and JoeQwerty answers are equally valid. Claim the money and don't worry about the thoughts of people you're never going to see again. £27 isn't "petty", and they agreed to pay it. I've claimed less than £2 before now; it's the principle of the thing (I've also waved away hundreds as inconsequential, although that was between friends). – Justin Mar 14 at 9:12
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£25 is not an insignificant amount, although not a crippling one.

It's not petty, not at all. Add to it that they already offered to pay, and this would actually be a good opportunity to push the door open a crack in case future opportunities with this company arise and you wish to take advantage of them.

Along with your receipts, attach a letter stating how you enjoyed interviewing with the company, and that your expenses, while relatively small are not insignificant to you at this time, and that you appreciate their generosity.

This will likely leave a good impression, and while it may never amount to anything, it certainly costs nothing to be nice, and since so few people bother, it can help, especially if you get into the habit. It cannot hurt you, but it may help you. It's a pretty good potential reward for little risk.

Personally, if I were at that company, and got asked for reimbursement, and saw an amount like that come across my desk, I'd be impressed with someone being honest enough not to pad it.

Do it, include the letter, and good luck in your hunt.

  • I would reach out to them thanking them for their generosity. But I'll be honest I didn't quite enjoy interviewing with them, since it was a big screw up on their part and a waste of time for everyone. (check the link in the question), I'll be nice to them in email though. :-) – James Mar 13 at 21:51
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£27 or £27 million. It's money you spent on their behalf that you wouldn't have spent otherwise. I see no reason not to ask them to reimburse it.

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Just to add another angle:

The company had initially expressed interest to reimburse the travel expenses. As I was wary about it, [...]

Why was that? The company already agreed (hopefully in writing) to reimburse you for the travel needed for the interview, why would you be wary about the claim? I mean, even before getting the interview, you are suspecting the employer, I'd say, that's a good enough reason to not to attend the interview itself. Ask yourself: If you were employed, how many things you would have to be wary about?

That said: You did what you did, and the thing that matters here is the "reimbursement", not the amount. As mentioned, after the interview ending in a negative result, you inquired "again" and the confirmed that they would be happy to (as I expect any decent organization would be), so I see no reason for you to not to go ahead with the process.

You spend the money, you were promised you will be paid back and now you ask for it. It's not petty, it's doing what is expected, there's no two things about that.

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