-1

I need help. I'm a newly promoted Team leader and currently having a hard time handling an attrition. This person has a Team lead experience but was hired as an individual contributor in our company a month ago. He is now deciding to leave the company because of an offer for a Team Lead position from a different company. Though I feel upset about it, I don't want to stop him from leaving if he thinks this position will help him personally. But is there any thing else I can do or say that can change his mind?

closed as too broad by Philip Kendall, gnat, bruglesco, The Wandering Dev Manager, IDrinkandIKnowThings Mar 18 at 15:24

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    This is something only you can answer. Do you understand why he prefers the other company to yours? – Philip Kendall Mar 17 at 19:43
  • Do you think this is due the the attrition you mention? If so, could you expand on it? Do you think this person is leaving because he used to be a team leader in the past? Usually people leave, specially if they perceive the new offer as better suited to their plans. – Quaestor Lucem Mar 17 at 19:59
  • But is there any thing else I can do or say that can change his mind? - How could we answer this? Ask this person. – joeqwerty Mar 17 at 20:39
  • “I don't want to stop him from leaving“ - You could not prevent this from happening. You cannot make someone stay in a position. – Donald Mar 17 at 21:38
  • 1
    Your effort and attention are probably more productively spent making sure that your remaining people feel that their skills are well utilized and well compensated, and seem valued. – Chris Stratton Mar 17 at 22:02
4

Other than offering a team lead position and / or a significant raise I don't see much that you or your company could do.

He is not long enough part of your company to develop attachments and it won't impact your company that much either if he goes unless he is the only one in your place doing his job.

Make sure your team gets adequate replacement as soon as possible and good luck with your problems.

Don't let things get to you that are out of your control and make sure you have enough free time for yourself.

  • The last sentence is the most important – Kilisi Mar 17 at 21:44
  • Totally agree with your answer. The managers should be asking themselves what they could have done to prevent that. Have they paid him appropriately? Was he treated well? Did his work match his abilities and ambition? Usually when an employee accepted an offer it's already too late to change his mind. – Yury Mar 18 at 9:13
2
  1. Talk it through with him. Make sure you understand the motivations and discuss all pros and cons between both options openly and honestly; rank, money, impact, culture, commute, technical growth, as much was he is willing to share
  2. If you both feel there is a good future for him at your place, make an effort to create this based on your discussion. Make sure you are honest about this: if he really wants team lead and you have no team lead position, just say so.
  3. If there is no viable option: thank him for his time, figure out a good transition plan and make sure you throw him a nice good-bye event.
  4. Revisit your hiring practice. You should only hire people if there it's a good fit for their own career aspirations and there is a credible long term fit. In this case you may have hired someone who was "overqualified" and actually wanted more. An impressive candidate is tempting, but it rarely works out long term if it's "too good to be true".
0

Depending on the field that you are in, the world is a pretty small place. As a general approach I'd prefer supporting their movement to be happy in their career. While it may not help you or company immediately, it will build good will that may come back and pay dividends in the future.

As to this specific individual taking a job and then one month later wanting to leave because of another offer with a better title. From experience this isn't an individual you want to try to retain. They weren't committed to your company if they are still considering job offers.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.