4

I have an interview next week with a new company. I just talked to a recruiter from the company this morning and he asked me what salary I was expecting. I didn’t hesitate for a second and blurted out what Im already making.

I already had it in my mind that my current job is fine and I only want to find a new position if it’s something that interests me and if its pay is significantly higher, but for some reason this is what came out of my mouth instead!

Im thinking of just cancelling the interview since Ive already sold myself short, or is there any coming back? My thinking is I should have said way more and negotiate down, but now I have no buffer to work with now.

Edit concerning the potential duplicate. The question of whether discussing salary so early on has been answered and answered well. What I get from that is a resounding yes. I came into this with that assumption already but my brain and tongue misfired. My question is more specifically geared towards whether or not its even worth my time now that my cards are on the table. I’m not hurting for opportunities — although the more the merrier — and I have a job at the moment.

  • 2
    "On further research, it seems a typical rate for this role in this city is..." if you can support that with even subjective evidence, or continue to pursue this, but also pursue other things at the same time. Don't cancel just because of this. – Chris Stratton Mar 21 at 18:36
  • 1
  • 1
    Sorry it's awkward, but remember this is their fault, too. It's a common and often annoying negotiating tactic used to lowball. I'd say phrase something like the following in your own words, "I am interested and this seems a good place. That said, I’m still happy at my current job and a core reason I am entertaining other positions would be to move forward instead of laterally." – John Spiegel Mar 21 at 20:45
  • You can try to brush it of saying you thought the question was about how much you are making now how much you are expecting from the company. That should give you room for increasing your salary expectation. – Zefiryn Mar 22 at 20:48
8

I don't see why you need to cancel the interview. So you gave a number, it's not a contract that you'll accept that number if an offer is made. Go to the interview and if they're interested, there will likely be another money conversation. If so, this time be prepared and name your price for switching jobs. Don't forget other benefits. If they try to object, simply state that based on the role, total benefits package offered, or other circumstances, that this is what it would take for you to work for them.

If they cannot meet your price, thank them for considering you and wish them well on their search. Or take the job at lower salary, it's up to you.

  • Yes, it wasn't set in stone, just a ball park figure. Negotiations can carry on right until the contract is signed. – Kilisi Mar 22 at 0:51
  • Thanks for the advise. I didn't feel like I had to cancel the interview, I just thought maybe I should learn my lesson from this slip and devote my time to looking at other opportunities since they've already been anchored at too low a number. I think its a good idea to check out the opportunity and then decide. – javil Mar 22 at 4:29
3

I've taken a contrary view to the whole "don't name your number until they give one first" idea.

I've done way too many interviews where I don't indicate my expectations, I do the interview and get the offer, and then the offered salary is way below than what I'm making now, so low it's not going to be negotiated up. Now we've all wasted everyone's time, especially mine.

If you've done your homework and know exactly what you are worth, and I can't emphasize that enough, then for Pete's sake name your number and put your stake in the ground. If the company can't approach that number, then you've saved yourself a lot of work.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.