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I am currently working as a software developer and was working on a project which was put on hold and its development stopped.

After that project went on hold, I have resigned from my current role. (I have not resigned because the project was put on hold, but because of getting better opportunities.) As the project is not active, I had thought that they will let me go earlier than the normal notice period served. The normal notice period is 2 months.

After two weeks of my resignation, they have assigned a new project to me to work from scratch and it is in a different framework where I didn't work in the past.

Now, I don't want to learn that new framework and work on it and I want to leave early from my current role.

Please let me know how can I approach it for leaving earlier without normal notice period served?

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    If you weren't quitting soon, would you be allowed to refuse a new task and refuse to learn a new framework? Would your response to everyday assignments be different if you were staying at the job? – user34587 Mar 25 at 10:44
  • Other than asking, check if you have any accumulated vacation days you can use at the end of your period to leave earlier. – Xander Mar 25 at 10:48
  • @Kozaky the assignment is same as software development but the framework is new to me, and that framework is not useful in near future – Satish Mar 25 at 10:56
  • @Xander I Dont want extra vacation, but If i join early to new organization than I will get some financial benefit – Satish Mar 25 at 10:57
  • Did you not agree a leaving date when you handed in your resignation?? Unless you expect to work the contracted notice period, you should always make sure both parties know what date you want to leave. – Smock Mar 25 at 14:52
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Now, I don't want to learn that new framework and work on it and I want to leave early from my current role.

That's your problem. You "assumed" things here, which you were not supposed to. Company has all the rights to ensure you are not relieved before the completion of the entire notice period, as mentioned in the contract.

Till the time company is paying you (including notice period), they are free to assign you tasks. If you simply refuse them (because you want an early release or whatever), company has the rights to take necessary disciplinary actions against you, as mentioned in the contract and/or company policies.

Please let me know how can I approach it for leaving earlier without normal notice period served.

You can, at most "request" the organization (your manager and your HR) for an early release, however, to make an exception to the general policy is up to the discretion of the company.

  • The asker could make a fairly good argument why it is the company's interest to let them go now rather than to have them start into something unfamiliar they may not be around to finish. It may well be that project was assigned only because it was all they could think of to get any sort of return for what they would be paying for the asker's time. – Chris Stratton Mar 25 at 13:16
  • @ChrisStratton If the company was thinking of any "returns", thy would not have retained the employee in first place. Since OP was not working on any active project, it would not have hurt to have him released and the whole scenario of profit-loss calculation would have been avoided. However, seeing that they deliberately added the new project (not training, KT, documentation of existing project etc.) after two weeks, it does not appear a random case here. There might be other side of the story. – Sourav Ghosh Mar 25 at 13:21
  • Keeping people at jobs they don't want and where they can't do anything useful just because you have a piece of paper which says you can is a uniquely pathological work culture. A manager who does that sacrifices the quality of the work to enjoy their petty power trip. – Chris Stratton Mar 25 at 13:25
  • @ChrisStratton Completely agree, and if the company has basic business sense, it should release a non functional employee, there is no worthy return of retaining in these cases. – Sourav Ghosh Mar 25 at 13:27
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A notice period is just that - a period of time which the company can keep you as an employee.

  1. They have the legal right to keep you as their employee and give you work as to any employee. It is your duty to perform any work given as if you were not leaving. Otherwise, the company can cause you serious trouble.

  2. If you ask them nicely, and if they agree, you may leave earlier. The key is:

    • you ask nicely;
    • they agree.

Of course, they can choose to not agree, and there is nothing you can do.

Possible way to put it in words:

Dear (boss), as you know I worked on project (project name), which was put on hold. After that happened, I found some opportunities at another company, and I accepted their offer. I am aware that I owe you the notice period, but at the same time, since I have to learn the new framework, I will not be very productive anyway.

Therefore, it might be in our mutual best interest if you agree that I leave earlier. In that way you have the benefit that you do not have to pay me just for learning the new framework, and I can take care of my deals as well.

Of course, if you change the words a little, it will not matter. I assume that you will actually use Indian instead of English anyway.

  • I understand that the as per the contract I should follow and company can take action, but as I want to ask it as nicely manner will you please help me how can I ask as nicely manner? – Satish Mar 25 at 11:02
  • OK, I added to my answer. – virolino Mar 25 at 11:40
  • I am aware that I owe you the notice period, but at the same time, since I have to learn the new framework, I will not be very productive anyway. If I'm the boss, who has assigned this new work, despite knowing that he is going to leave, I'm not likely bothered about the productivity. There must be something going on between OP and the manager, otherwise this assignment looks like just a placeholder to retain OP for the longest possible time and delay the release date. – Sourav Ghosh Mar 25 at 11:43
  • @SouravGhosh: You re-iterated the facts. And your point is? I am not sure I managed to get it. – virolino Mar 25 at 11:45
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    Well, the notice period works for both sides. Maybe the manager just assumes that @Satish doesn't want to leave earlier and obviously has to assign him some task until he is gone? So asking nicely doesn't hurt. I always planned the start of my now job after the notice period, so leaving earlier would have left me with one month or more unpaid and I wouldn't agree to that. – Josef Mar 25 at 12:06

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