1

I'm posting this on behalf of my colleague:

I recently joined a company in a remote small office in the US. One of our company receptionists (those checking in visitors at the door) is a rude and impolite woman. I'm not sure if that is because of my race/religion (it's a sales department originally dominated by white employees. We are a small science group working remotely). I'm a PhD scientist busy with our most important company-wide project and seeing the impoliteness and rudeness of an assistant is disturbing my focus. I'm new with many questions and administrative queries, but I'm hesitated to ask her and usually ask questions after hours when she is replaced. She even ignores my emails.

How to deal with her? Should I raise it with her manager via email not as a complaint, but as a constructive feedback? If yes, how? What would be the consequences?

closed as off-topic by gnat, solarflare, gazzz0x2z, JazzmanJim, IDrinkandIKnowThings Apr 1 at 15:51

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • guys, all gender/ethnicity mentioned are desriptors for adding details. lawyers always use this language. – Tina J Mar 31 at 16:01
  • ok. But the question is should he really raise it to the manager? Bad luck he is new and afraid of leaving a negative impression of starting a fight right in the beginning. – Tina J Mar 31 at 18:22
  • 1
    @teego1967 well said. I believe ignorance is best. – Tina J Mar 31 at 22:22
8

How to deal with her? Should I email and raise it with her manager as not a complaint, but as a constructive feedback? If yes, how and what would be consequences?

It's not at all clear what you mean by racist here. And it's not clear to whom this person is exhibiting rude and impolite behavior.

If an assistant is behaving rudely to you and it bothers you enough, it might make sense to call (not email) her manager and discuss this "sensitive situation".

Avoid using terms like "white department", "racist", etc, (as you did in the original version of your question) or you might get yourself into an accusation with no proof. Stick to the facts behind the behavior toward you that you would like to see changed. Avoid speculating on the motivation behind them.

The consequences (if any) would depend on the seriousness of the accusations.

  • 3
    Thanks. I liked your opinions. Right- better to stick only with facts and not "motivations/assumptions" as it might make it a big and very sensitive issue. – Tina J Mar 31 at 16:08
  • I guess calling would also help him be kept anonymous?! (unless her manager asked him for name). – Tina J Mar 31 at 16:18
  • Ok. But the question is should he really raise it to the manager? Bad luck he is new and afraid of leaving a negative impression of starting a fight right in the beginning. – Tina J Mar 31 at 18:23
0

I would say that if your "company assistant" (seems to be a receptionist) is "rude and impolite", then she would get plenty of complaints from visitors.

Let's say I visited your company, and the receptionist was "rude and impolite" according to my standards, then she would hear about it directly from me, or whoever I was talking to in the company would hear about it. I don't see much of a requirement for you to do that.

The exception would be if it was at a place visited by people in a weak position, say the receptionist receiving visitors in a jail. If that person was "rude and impolite" to people who might fear retaliation if they complain, then I would see it as my duty to do my best to get rid of her.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.