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Just now a months long business travel is in the works (due next month) but I really want to leave before this happens, will it be decent and professional for me to send my resignation now? Or should I let that pass first then I resign?

It also doesn't help that I seriously do not want this travel as I've done this before and the experience (despite the good), is something I do not want to go back to (involves snot and crying). I've moved on, but hearing that this travel will happen again is making me want to book it.

Should I still try to resign asap? If I send a resignation now, it's also gonna appear that I'm someone just trying to avoid this trip

To explain my situation a bit further; I do not have another job lined up. But I'm confident that my experience will get me a suitable job before running out of money. Thankfully my financial situation implies I can probably last being unemployed for 2-3 months without exhausting half of my bank account.

I'm losing sanity :(

Should I resign? Is it professional for me to do so?

closed as off-topic by gnat, mcknz, Dan Neely, WorkerWithoutACause, Strader Apr 4 at 15:49

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on a specific choice, such as what job to take or what skills to learn, are difficult to answer objectively and are rarely useful for anyone else. Instead of asking which decision to make, try asking how to make the decision, or for more specific details about one element of the decision. (More information)" – mcknz, Dan Neely, WorkerWithoutACause, Strader
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  • this is a comment based question and you are asking us to tell you what to do. Please try and reword it so that it is beneficial for others as well – fireshark519 Apr 4 at 12:26
  • @JoeStrazzere The travel itself isn't the problem, but the experience, environment and accommodation from this specific company, and yes, the travel part isn't stated anywhere in the contract. – Abana Clara Apr 4 at 12:33
  • @JoeStrazzere Not really no, but they made it clear that if there's another trip, none of us have really have a choice. – Abana Clara Apr 4 at 12:41
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    @Kyralessa the last trip didn't go too well for me and my boss and it got toxic and personal and I cried. Didnt help that we were living in the same dayme apartment during the stay, and definitely still would next month. – Abana Clara Apr 4 at 15:07
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    Which country is this in, and what notice period applies? (In the UK, for example, notice period is usually spelled out in the employment contract, though it's up to the employer whether they make you work your notice; if so, you can still take any holiday due.) – gidds Apr 4 at 15:22
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Just now a months long business travel is in the works (due next month) but I really want to leave before this happens, will it be decent and professional for me to send my resignation now?

If you are giving sufficient notice, then it doesn't matter if you resign before or after this trip. Assuming that a month or less notice is required in your locale, then resign when it makes sense for you.

To explain my situation a bit further; I do not have another job lined up, but I had recruiters calling me ever since I posted my profile on a hiring website. Thankfully my financial situation implies I can probably last being unemployed for 2-3 months without exhausting half of my bank account.

Don't quit without having another job waiting for you. (Search for other Questions here to learn why that is a bad idea).

Find a new job first. Get and accept a formal offer. Give your notice. Work the notice period. Then leave this job behind.

While seeking your next job, it might make sense to find one that won't involve any travel.

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    One thing. Regarding the usually iron-clad rule that it is pointless to quit before securing the next job. Really, for most programmers in the current environment, this rule is a soft rule. – Fattie Apr 4 at 12:52
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    @JoeStrazzere This was actually my first job, and I was only an absorbed intern, so I definitely did not know jack back then. I only accepted it because I learned a lot during my internship and it's 5 minutes away. – Abana Clara Apr 4 at 12:56
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Maybe talk to your manager? He might be able to help you if you are good at what you do. If it is a part of your job description then it is your job, if you don't want it then apply for another position within the company or apply for a different job.

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    Actually this is a great answer. Just frankly tell your manager "I won't go on anymore business trips, what to do?" See what they say. – Fattie Apr 4 at 13:05
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There's a couple of issues here

  1. Recruiters calling you means nothing. Absolutely nothing. It's like saying "I received some spam in my email".

  2. In answer to your most direct question, give your notice when you want to. The upcoming travel is totally irrelevant.

  3. You say

"it's also gonna appear that I'm someone just trying to avoid this travel that none of us seem to want"

This is confusing. The business travel is in fact a perfectly good, indeed excellent, reason to resign. You or your colleagues would say to your boss "I'm resigning because I don't want to do those trips." Very simple.

(Obviously you don't have to give any reason when you resign. State the words "I'm resigning." But dislike of the trips is an absolutely good reason to resign.)

It is absolutely commonplace that managers hear things like "I'm resigning because the travel is no good." That's a normal and good reason for resigning.

  1. You're going to quit without a new job to go to. There are a couple issues here:

4a. You mention that you got some recruiter spam. This means nothing. It could be that you can easily get another job, but, the recruiter spam has no connection one way or another.

4b. As a rule, don't quit until you get a new job. Why would you? Just keep taking the money until you secure a new job.

However...

4c. There are exceptions to this. For software engineers, the market is so hot that you have to reconsider the rule of "don't leave until you have a new job". For programmers, if your speciality is in demand and if you are good and if location is not an issue, there are distinct advantages to "just leaving" and then choosing a new job. The two advantages are folks hiring programmers want them now, now, now; if you're aggressively ready to go see them and indeed start "anytime" it's a huge advantage; secondly, having quit your previous job is a huge mark of confidence, it means you know exactly what you're doing and you're not "just looking", you know what you want.

  1. Commuting. Commnuting is hell. It sounds like in short you dislike your current job (due to the travel) but you're stuck with it due to the location issues. Could it be you in fact have t move to resolve this issue? If you're trapped you're trapped. Commuting for hours is a non-starter, so, ... is the only solution moving?

But overwhelmingly...

We now know that our OP is a software engineer. In today's market it is almost certainly the case that she can now change from on-site employment to fully-remote employment.

This completely solves all problems:

  • OP can still live in the unusual/remote area
  • No commuting (at all)
  • Escape the current "business trips" company

Easy.

  • Thanks for this input. I am only a young'in who has zero experience with this so please pardon me but learned a lot from this. It's on point, I'm a software engineer/web developer. I can't say I am absolutely in-demand or do I poop absolutely good products, but I think my skillset is somewhere out there. – Abana Clara Apr 4 at 12:55
  • You get old fast programming :) Please do note that (1) yes, as a programmer the market is insanely high at the moment, but (2) just be aware that the recruiter calls are simply spam. All programmers get saturation messages from recruiters, it means nothing. – Fattie Apr 4 at 13:02
  • ah - ok now that we know the situation. i've edited in the actual answer down the bottom, @AbanaClara ! Enjoy ! – Fattie Apr 4 at 13:04
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    hi @AbanaClara this is another topic, but, 2 years is a long, long, long time for your first job. I'd say you need to move on promptly to develop and accelerate your earning (and skills). Again it's another topic. Good luck. – Fattie Apr 4 at 13:12
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    I disagree that having quit your previous job is a mark of confidence. As a recruiter it tells me there was some conflict with your previous employer that was so bad you ran away without having a safety net, or you resigned before being forced to leave. It's not necessarily a problem, but it's not usually a positive. – thelem Apr 4 at 14:22

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