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In December 2018, I left my most recent job at a bank. Before doing so, I had been sending out a host of resumes, all of which said 2017-Present.

I also sent a resume to a friend to be referred to a company I had already replied to. In Jan, I got a call from a recruiter about the company I applied to/my friend referred me to. I went through a very long interview process, eventually recieving a job offer in April.

I was already offered the job and put the date that I left on the form for the background check.

Now, I'm going through the background check, which states all information must match the resume/company submitted profile. The thing is, I never updated my resume. I didn't lie about being at my old job during the interviews but I also never thought to send in a new resume, so I think people assumed I was. What should I do? I'm freaking out.

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    What would be the harm in simply checking with the recruiter, "Do you have my most up-to-date CV?" It was a long interview process after all, more than just your current job might have changed in that time. – user34587 Apr 25 at 10:17
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    Was your CV dated in any way? I put a current date on my CVs - you never know when an old one will resurface. Having said that I believe Sourav Ghosh's answer is correct and have upvoted it. – Player One Apr 25 at 10:40
  • I was already offered the job and put the date that I left on the form for the background check. However, during the job process, when I was asked why I was returning to consulting, I framed my answer to say how I missed that work, etc, etc and that, from my time at my old company, I didn't have the chance to work on projects I wanted. – ElizaK Apr 25 at 10:53
  • At this point, I'm not even sure if its worth it to send an updated resume. During the interview process, I never lied but I did frame my answers so that it might not have been clear I left my old job. – ElizaK Apr 25 at 10:54
  • as P1 says, resumes are either explicitly dated, or "dated" the day they were sent. Of course, th info can only be correct as of the date of the resume. – Fattie Apr 25 at 13:11
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No need to freak out. At the point of sending out the resume, you held the position and the job. That should be proof enough for you.

Edit:

I was already offered the job and put the date that I left on the form for the background check.

You did the correct thing. I'm reassuring you, nothing to be worried.

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    Agreed, it was correct at the time they received it. It would be beyond silly on their part to reject you now, having invested time and money in recruiting you, on the basis that you didn't continually supply them with a new CV any time anything changed. – delinear Apr 25 at 10:53
  • But wouldn't it be bad that interviewers based their assumptions off my outdated resume? I feel like I should just decline the offer and back out of the background check. – ElizaK Apr 25 at 11:02
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    @ElizaK no you shouldn't, the only possible outcome from that is not getting the job. Stop freaking out. You listed a job as "until present" while you were working at that job, and that's fine. Anyone who doesn't understand that isn't worth working for, and they'll be in the minority, so don't shoot yourself in the foot here. – Player One Apr 25 at 11:05
  • This is very helpful but I am worried that my last interview was in March, when I'd been gone from my job for threeish months. My interviewer had my old resume which was outdated, obviously, at that point. I just feel like it might be better to pull out rather than seem like a complete liar. Also, my offer was really competitive-it's a consulting job and I was at an investment bank. In retrospect, it feels like I wouldn't have gotten such a high offer had they known I left. – ElizaK Apr 25 at 19:37
  • @ElizaK Always take an updated resume to every interview and provide it to them. – UnhandledExcepSean Apr 26 at 13:37

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