4

The company I am currently employed with does not offer a payout for unused vacation time; any unused time is forfeited upon my leave.

That being said, what I would like to do is give my notice to my current employer the minimum two weeks in advance, plus the number of unused vacation days (in my case, this would be two weeks + three additional days).

I would write in my notice that my effective last day in the office would be in two weeks, but my official termination be three business days past the effective date, so that I can take the last official employment days as PTO and be paid for those accrued days.

As I am employed in an at-will state, I understand it's possible that my employment will simply be terminated on my last effective day rather than my requested official day, but aside from this possibility, what should I be considering? Or, should I not consider doing this at all?

  • 1
    What is the location of your employer? – Brian R Apr 25 at 17:23
  • how much do you care about those 3 days compared to possible hassle? – aaaaaa Apr 25 at 18:17
  • @BrianR Georgia. I don't care to make too much of a hassle, and for me, the start date at the new company is already committed, so taking PTO now isn't too much of an option. Oh well. – user124605 Apr 25 at 19:07
11

Most places I have worked prohibited taking PTO during the notice period. The first thing I would do if I was in your situation is check my contract and employee handbook to see if that is the case for you. If it is then you will need to decide if you want to take the 3 days PTO before handing in your notice or just sacrifice your accrued PTO.

4

As I am employed in an at-will state, I understand it's possible that my employment will simply be terminated on my last effective day rather than my requested official day, but aside from this possibility, what should I be considering? Or, should I not consider doing this at all?

The other possibility you should consider is that you are terminated the moment you hand in your resignation.

If you can propose to your new company a start date that will take into consideration the two weeks notice and your unused vacation days, you can then actually use those vacation days (assuming you have the flexibility to do so on such a short notice) and hand in your two weeks notice when you return.

  • I have faith that I wouldn't be terminated immediately, as I'm on great terms with the team. I don't necessarily want to push my luck with the vacation time at the end, though... The start date is a good point. I was considering I could have my start date at the new employer overlap the PTO days, but I imagine then I start getting into some legal questions of being employed at two companies at one time, etc. – user124605 Apr 25 at 17:14
  • Well, it seems like I have my answer: "Vacation cannot be used to postpone an employee's date of employment termination." Oh well, I'd still love to keep this question up for opinions on how to handle this, as surely I'm not alone wondering about this. – user124605 Apr 25 at 17:21
1

Take the time off first, then, upon return (or a week or so later), hand in your resignation.

This is the only way to guarantee that you get "paid" for those vacation days.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.