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I received an InMail on LinkedIn regarding a job prospect with a fairly new company. The message is from one of the founders of the company and it said they were looking for people with my kind of work experience with a link to the list of open positions at said company.


I checked the company and like what they are trying to build. So I check out the list of open positions and find a suitable role for myself.

They have mentioned a salary range next to the roles and I felt that number was too low (even the upper bound of the range).

Normally I would respond with interest and then wait for them to bring up the discussion about numbers, but in this case, seeing that they have kept the numbers fairly transparent, I don't think they will be looking accommodate a figure way out of their specified range (about 30%).


Should I mention that I am interested but the salary is too low when responding?
Or should I just assume that they will not be flexible with the numbers and let this one pass?
Or should I assume those numbers are merely suggestions and wait and see how the conversation pans out?

marked as duplicate by gnat, Dukeling, Michael Grubey, Rory Alsop, Monoandale May 4 at 9:51

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  • If they are unable to give more than the max. suggested, will you still consider joining or is it a deal breaker? – PagMax Apr 29 at 15:59
  • The number they have mentioned is a deal breaker. That is about 10% less than what I currently make and 30% less than an offer I would seriously consider. – wplace Apr 29 at 16:00
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You can thank them for their interest and politely decline citing that the posted salary is not within an acceptable range for you. This gives them the opportunity to begin a discussion with you around potential salary if they are flexible.

  • +1, but I would ask if they are offering any compensation for a reduced rate, e.g. shares or options. – Justin Apr 29 at 17:13
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Any parameters that are potential deal-breakers, for you or for them, should be addressed as soon as possible. They are interested in you and you seem to be interested in them, so there's no reason not to ask questions.

Addressing deal-breakers early saves time for both sides if you can identify that it isn't going to work out in the end. This will protect both sides from spending time and effort when it isn't going to work out anyway.

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Or should I just assume that they will not be flexible with the numbers and let this one pass?

Or should I assume those numbers are merely suggestions and wait and see how the conversation pans out?

The truth will be somewhere between these. It could be that the roles are not 100% defined, and that if you actually bring more qualifications than needed, they create a different position - especially in a new company. I would send an application and potentially refer to tariffs/usual market rates. The number they put there is probably a good starting point for a negotiation. If you see that the high number is not just to low for you, but in general to low for the market by more than 25% i would not consider it a good sign for the company.

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