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To put it short, I was contacted. In my opinion, he did not give me enough information. I asked about job tasks and company's name. He did tell me company's location, why the company is looking for new developers, contract type and that his boss would give me more information in an interview.

I explained that having that information would allow me to realise if I am a good fit for the role. And I said that was important since I have a job now and going for an interview would mean getting free time. Was my answer right? Thanks in advance

closed as unclear what you're asking by mxyzplk, IDrinkandIKnowThings, sf02, JazzmanJim, Michael Grubey May 2 at 23:54

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  • @JoeStrazzere thanks for your comment. I might have asked too much information. He wanted to make an interview without telling me about job tasks. – Alexander May 1 at 0:56
  • @JoeStrazzere I am asking if I asked too much information – Alexander May 1 at 0:58
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    You need to expand on this a whole bunch to make it answerable. So what did he tell you? Is there a job description? It's not unusual for recruiters to withhold a company name, but there's not enough information here to make a judgement on the rest. – mxyzplk May 1 at 1:10
  • @mxyzplk Thanks for your answer. He did tell me company's location, why the company is looking for new developers, contract type and that his boss would give me more information in an interview. – Alexander May 1 at 1:13
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This is normal, though it's your choice whether it's enough information to bother with an interview.

He's a recruiter. Recruiters often don't share company names because you might approach the company directly, till you've let them submit you to that company so it's "on the record" that they represent you and get their cut.

Also, recruiters don't know the details of day to day tasks of these positions. They know "they want a mid-level Java programmer to program on their financial thingy." Any details they do give you have a 50% chance of being wrong so it's probably for the best.

So you're getting a standard kind of recruiter approach. Based on what you know, maybe that's worth taking time off to interview and maybe it's not. You can just play hardball, and say "Sorry, I don't plan to take off time to interview without more information about the role." They might give you more details, they might have the hiring manager set up a "quick chat" via phone prior to an actual formal interview, or they might move on to someone who's being less high maintenance. If you're OK with any of those outcomes, roll hard.

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If you're not comfortable with the level of detail you've been given, and if the recruiter is unable or unwilling to give you the level of detail that you require, then move on. It's as simple as that.

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