3

I have accepted a conditional job offer (subject to background checks) and am yet to tell my current employers.

The plan is to wait until the offer is firm before handing my resignation and breaking in my news.

However, not breaking the news is making me feel very uncomfortable at work.

Is it best to wait or just do it anyway?

15

Join your hands, close your eyes and repeat after me: Never hand out the notice and break the news until you have another confirmed offer sealed and settled in stone.

The plan is to wait until the offer is firm before handing my resignation and breaking in my news

Given that by saying "offer is firm" you mean the contract is signed, it's a good plan, follow it without second thoughts. In case the contract is yet to be signed, go back to the beginning of the answer and re-read the first sentence.

4

I agree with the above answer, but wanted to highlight that you should check your contact/company to see exactly how long your notice time is, to ensure you don't try and hand your notice in a week before starting your new job, when your contract states you must give two weeks notice!

  • Well, this really should not affect the decision of when to hand out the notice and inform - it's after the contract is finalized. Whatever notice period has to be served, that needs to be taken into account while negotiating the date of joining to the new job. – Sourav Ghosh May 16 at 12:58
  • @SouravGhosh That is true, but not all jobs allow you to negotiate the joining date. – Uciebila May 16 at 13:08
  • 1
    @Uciebila But unless you have an unusual long notice period considering your current job and location, one's next company will take that into account. – Abigail May 16 at 13:32
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    Has been hinted at, the next company will take your notice period when they decide when your start date will be. After all, if they want you to honor your notice period with them, they should allow you to honor your current notice period. – Ramhound May 16 at 15:05
  • Already agreed for the Start date to be flexible. – bobo2000 May 16 at 22:25

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