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I’m a junior developer.

After I asked to be promoted to intermediate earlier this year, my manager has now informed me verbally that I’ll be promoted within the next two months. At this point, salary has not yet been mentioned by either parties.

Should I get in there first with a higher than market value salary with the expectation of being low-balled but to a salary I’ll happily take or do I wait patiently for the offer and only then negotiate appropriately if necessary? My gut says the latter but this is my first promotion and I wish not to make any naive mistakes.

This is a very helpful related question/answer but it doesn’t answer my question exactly: Can you negotiate salary on a promotion?

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  • I think that the accepted answer of the post you linked is quite thorough, and cover several points on how to negotiate, what tone to use etc... additionally, I think that the post gnat linked does answer the specific question you asked here... combining both posts I feel you should have your answer. – DarkCygnus May 20 at 18:38
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    Mild promotions rarely result in significant raises, unless you did something exceptional like save or make the company millions. – Juha Untinen May 20 at 18:40
  • Does your company not have a standard range of salary for the position? I'd expect you probably don't have a lot of room for negotiation in that case, but will simply be bumped up to just over minimum for the position. – Keith May 20 at 18:51
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After I asked to be promoted to intermediate earlier this year, my manager has now informed me verbally that I’ll be promoted within the next two months. At this point, salary has not yet been mentioned by either parties.

Next time around, instead of just asking to be promoted, ask for a promotion and a raise. That way you'll know up front.

When you were informed that you will be promoted within the next two months, you should have asked something like "Thanks! Will a raise come along with that?" That could have started the discussion and any subsequent negotiations.

Since you didn't mention it then, find a quiet time soon (perhaps during a regular one-on-one meeting) to ask about it. Decide ahead of time how hard you want to negotiate any raise, and what you would accept.

Usually managers have paperwork to file for promotions. In that paperwork would be any salary increase. If you wait until after the promotion paperwork is done and your promotion is formalized, it may be much more difficult to get what you want.

Some companies separate promotions and raises and wouldn't automatically tie the two in together. After this promotion goes through, you'll have a better understanding of company policy in that regard.

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Should I get in there first with a higher than market value salary with the expectation of being low-balled but to a salary I’ll happily take or do I wait patiently for the offer and only then negotiate appropriately if necessary?

You don't get what you don't ask for.

Waiting patiently is the politically safe, non-confrontational, low-risk way to do it, but is also much less effective.

Getting in there first with a number "anchors" the negotiation in your favor. Rather than just throwing out a "higher than market value salary" that may be unreasonable, however, it's better to determine what you think you are worth, then add a negotiating premium.

Have a specific number/percentage in mind, and communicate it directly along with reasons why you deserve that raise. It's then a little more difficult for an employer to say no.

You really have nothing to lose. The fact that you are getting promoted means they value your work. Worst case scenario is they will say no, or counter with a lower raise than you asked for.

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