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Hey so I'm just starting out on my 4th year of IBEW (International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers) and picked up a call for a fairly "wormy" contractor. They seem great though.

I did have a question about my role now that I am an "advanced" apprentice as far as standards go.

Do I make sure my fellow apprentices and below are not working before and after posted start/quit times? Taking and returning from breaks on time?

Reason I ask is because my JW (journeyman wireman) is asking as well, he has recently turned out. It would make life a lot easier on some of the old timers and newer JWs as we are just ramping up and getting a lot of new guys on as the work gets going.

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    hi and welcome to TWP. I tool liberty to edit your title and question a little bit. Please feel free to roll back. On topic: right now your question seems to be very IBEW-specific and might be not suitable for this site. Do you have a supervisor? What "fairly wormy contractor" means? – Oct18 is day of silence on SE May 26 at 2:29
  • Thanks! No worries – HarteScout 1 May 26 at 21:38
  • Are you asking if you should do this in an official capacity (where the company or union requires you to do this) or are you asking if you should be doing this as a mentor (where you just 'should' let JWs know what their rights/obligations are as far as hours and breaks)? – BSMP May 26 at 22:10
  • Basically as a mentor. I'm an apprentice, and will not be given any official responsibility like that unless it's in writing as far as I know. I always carry my local's by laws and agreement in my tool box. What I meant is... should I now be a little more forthcoming with the standards or am I still to just react and support as told to by the JW's? It probably depends on the specific job, and JW, but I'm just looking for some genral guidance. – HarteScout 1 May 26 at 22:13
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This is a broad answer, but you should do whatever your supervisor expects of you. Even though you belong to a union, your employer is ultimately the one who has the final say on what your responsibilities are. Even if there are standards within a union, the union and the employer may have come to a special arrangement.

If you do not have a supervisory role over these people, you should not get involved, other than to raise any concerns with your own supervisor.

Do you have a supervisory role? That is something that should be explicit, but hints if you are include, question around if you are you made aware and have influence over:

  • Rostering?
  • Employee leave?
  • Special working arrangements?

If you do have a supervisory role, you should be aware that that's got nothing to do with union membership.

  • thank you for the response! – HarteScout 1 May 26 at 21:36
  • As far as supervisory role? No, I just have some younger apprentices helping me with a huge lighting/conduit install – HarteScout 1 May 26 at 21:36
  • I'm also pretty well versed in how to perform as a Union Member. Was really just wondering if I need to step it up now that I'm an "advanced apprentice" being a 4th year. Again, thanks for the response! It has definitely helped – HarteScout 1 May 26 at 21:37

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