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My first employer was a startup and not very keen on documentation. And so I did not receive any salary receipts. My new employer is demanding the salary receipts from the previous employer and said I can show my bank statement if I don't have those. As I understand, my financial transactions are not concern of the new employer. In that situation, can I strike off (cover with ink) other transactions leaving the salary credit? Is that an accepted practice?

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    Asking if something is an accepted practice requires us to know where you are located. – mhoran_psprep May 28 at 12:29
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    Where are you located that your future employer needs to see your salary receipts? In some places it's actually illegal to ask for that information. – David K May 28 at 12:30
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    I'm from India and it's norm here for employers to seek information about past salary so that they can add 30-50% over the previous salary instead of paying what they intended to. There is no way around it. You don't show it, you don't get the job. No law is stopping them to not seek such sensitive information either. And so they need the salary sheet to see the candidate is saying truth about his past salary or not. That is my understanding though. I really don't know for sure why they need it. – X5010 May 28 at 12:53
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    Have you thought about asking your bank to provide a statement of the last 3 months payments from the previous employer - no extra info like that... – Solar Mike May 28 at 13:28
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    In Canada, we often strike our personal bank transactions before submitting an expense to an employer. May be you could strike the personal transactions and see how the new employer react? – Sebastien DErrico May 28 at 14:42
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Yes, you should be ok to strike off any visibility of financial information that isn't related to your previous income (if it's legal for your employer to ask).

Your new employer only needs to see the amount of salary paid and verify the payer reference. If they need to see anything more than that, then you'd really have to question that request.

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