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I am not a people person , i don't know how to interact with anyone socially, apart from work, I tried so many times but never gets a response and am the odd one out in office group. So in I have no friends and where ever I go I will become a topic of discussion.

No good friends or life-partner despite various efforts. My line manager is the biggest bottleneck in my career development, he doesn't want me learn anything new despite my best efforts and extreme hard work. Getting a new job is becoming very difficult day by day.

Recently I had a quarrel in within my group because of continuous negative comments and now i become more cutoff. I have no one else to interact with so I have keep up good relation within my group. Is there any way to attract more people and peer support in office.

Or shall I just .....

closed as off-topic by Philip Kendall, alroc, sf02, gnat, Dukeling Jun 3 at 20:06

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    "Is there any way to attract more people and peer support in office." What do you mean by this? Also, can you give some specific examples of how you aren't a people person and how you are acting to where they react poorly? Can you give examples of the negative comments? – さりげない告白 Jun 3 at 18:41
  • @JoeStrazzere It's also not uncommon in offices to pick on the quiet one to try and elicit a response. This might lead to frustration and ultimately cause the OP to snap. It's not just the OP, it can be the office culture, too. – Little Child Jun 3 at 18:52
  • Given a lack of ways of knowing what exactly is going wrong, have you tried general interpersonal advice books on getting along with people and compared their suggestions to your experience? E.g. "How To Win Friends and Influence People" may be a good place to start. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/How_to_Win_Friends_and_Influence_People You might also look into "soft skills training", information on emotional intelligence, talking with a therapist, etc. Getting along with people is a skill - trying is necessary, but rarely sufficient, and it takes a lot of practice along with good advice. – BrianH Jun 3 at 19:05
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    "Getting a new job is becoming very difficult day by day" It shouldn't be more difficult than getting your current job considering you have acquired more experience for your next job. – sf02 Jun 3 at 19:05
  • Keep in mind, while people generally need some sort of social outlet, that doesn't have to happen at work. Think of something you've always wanted to try or to learn to do (painting, rollerblading, playing the violin, anything) - and then google for a group that does/teaches/mentors/etc that. Get your social fix that way. Also, don't feel everything has to be done quickly; if you're the sort that never talks to someone, simply saying "Hello" where you wouldn't have before is worth being proud about. Self Improvement is rarely rapid. – Kevin Jun 5 at 15:37
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This post sounds disturbing with the way it cuts off. My suggestion is to seek mental help as opposed to building relationships at work. Work is work and most people do not go to a job to find friendship but to work to pay bills and live the life they want. They are not there to seek friends or become closer to others.

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    Dan, I upvote his, but may have spoiled it for you by editing the question to remove that disturbing ending. add it back, if you must, but I would rather not have it here. Your suggestion is spot on. – Mawg Jun 5 at 7:54
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If you can take a week or so break from work, that might be helpful. Maybe grab a book like Brian mentioned to take your mind off it too, so you don't spend the whole time analyzing things people said or did. Chances are, they probably didn't put much thought into some of the things you might be narrowing in on (I myself have a habit of over-analyzing what people say and do to me). And don't hesitate to talk to a therapist or the like--they can (and want to) help people enjoy life, even those with heavy struggles like schizophrenia, bi-polar, ptsd, etc. I bet they'd have some good tips for your situation.

I don't know how dire your situation is, but this site says: "If you are in crisis, please seek help immediately. Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) to reach a 24-hour crisis center, text MHA to 741741" https://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/im-looking-mental-health-help-myself

Call them up, dude. Life doesn't have to be so dark.

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