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I graduated before the enddate of my internship. I have 3 weeks left until the enddate and I have been put to work on regular employee's tasks while not being paid minimum wage and my internship company isn't clear of they're hiring me after the enddate(which i would like).

Do i tell my manager I'll leave if he doesn't hire me?

note: Im in software development and there's plenty of opportunities at other companies.

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    Was your internship defined by a contract or other agreement? Under what terms did you agree to work until it's end date? Was the type of work you were supposed to be given defined somehow as being different from "regular employee's tasks?" Have you talked with anyone about being hired full time after the internship, at all? "Hire me or else" seems like a poor way to start a conversation about your career. – dwizum Jun 14 at 18:13
  • The internship is defined by contract, as is the enddate. However the contract also states that the goal of the internship is educational. Which it was until now. Im currently implementing my research. This research includes proofs of concepts and documentation of which i graduated. but now im building an application that is based on my research. – Bork Jun 14 at 18:49
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From one of your (the OP's) comments :

[T]he contract [...] states that the goal of the internship is educational. Which it was until now. Im currently implementing my research. This research includes proofs of concepts and documentation of which i graduated. but now im building an application that is based on my research

Without knowing the specifics of what you are working on, etc., it seems to me that implementing one's research, by building an application based on it, would fall under the umbrella of things that are considered educational. Especially if it is only for the few weeks between you graduating and the end of your formal internship.

Again, without knowing specifics, assuming you are a university student with limited professional software development experience, the "implementation" that you are undertaking is more for your benefit than theirs. Plenty (the vast majority) of student internships involve nothing related to research, they are opportunities for students coming from university to learn some of the skills necessary to succeed as professional software developers.

I do think you should inquire with your manager (or the internship director, or whomever is appropriate) to see if they are considering you for a full-time position, but you should definitely not threaten to leave immediately if they don't intend to.

Even if they do not plan to offer you full-time employment, you should complete the internship as agreed to. Think of your long term goals, and how completing these few weeks will further them - this is an opportunity to learn some things that will possibly help your employment search, and the opportunity to hopefully impress you manager enough that he/she will provide a positive reference for you. You manager might have recommendations for where you should apply, introduce you to other's looking to hire, etc.

Storm out of there in a confrontation, and you'll close some doors you might not even know existed. It's only 3 weeks.

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    Agree 100% with "Storm out of there in a confrontation, and you'll close some doors you might not even know existed". This is generally true of any profession, but I've noticed the software industry is a surprisingly close-knitted community. Everyone seems to know everyone else in the area so word gets around and a single bad impression can follow you for decades. – aleppke Jun 14 at 20:35
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An approach I've used that has worked well is that I expect 30 days notice, and if I haven't been informed of an extension within 30 days of my end date then I will start looking for new employment with the expectation that my current gig here is ending at the contract date.

That puts the burden on the employer to make a decision 30 days out, which is usually enough time for me to get the next gig.

And since you're three weeks out ... start looking now.

Good luck.

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Do i tell my manager I'll leave if he doesn't hire me?

Your manager likely won't care- they can hire someone else.

Before threatening to leave if you don't get hired for full-time, you should look for another job. You might get a better opportunity or, at the very least, you'll have a safety net for if you don't get a return offer.

I would also highly recommend having a less-demanding conversation with either the internship program leader or your manager about returning for full-time. If the company is still unclear if they'll hire you- look for new jobs immediately for the worst case scenario.

Good luck

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