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I am software professional with many years of experience. A few years back I had left a company to start my own business. Unfortunately, my start-up didn't work out as I had expected. I'm now in need of a stable job.

Recently, I found job opening in the company that I had left. I applied for that position, and soon afterwards, I got a call from my ex-colleague who was working with me in the same company who is now manager there. They said were very excited to see my resume. They also went ahead said that they will schedule an interview (by a panel who doesn't know me in person, as per company policy).

Now I have lot of questions in my mind and really really looking for answers:

  1. I am in a poor financial position. Should I tell the manager? Would it look bad?

  2. I got phone calls from other ex-colleagues (from the same company), saying that they heard rumors that I am returning. After hearing this, I became little worried as these guys might create some impression about me on interview panel, that might cause interview process to become biased. Should I tell the manager?

And finally but very important....

  1. How should I tell the manager that I will be totally dedicated to my work, and that I don't want to miss this opportunity? I'm not sure how to tell them.
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I have financially gone very weak and badly looking for job. Shall I indicate it to John?

No. Why would you? It's completely irrelevant. You're looking for a job because you need to earn a living. That is the reason everyone takes a job. You are not unique in that respect. They don't need to know anything about your current financial situation.

I got phones from my other ex-colleagues (from the same company) saying that they heard rumors that I am joining back. After hearing this, I became little worried as these guys might create some impression about me on interview panel, that might cause interview process to become biased. Shall I inform about it to John?

Biased how? In what way? Even if you told John what would your telling him accomplish? What impact would that have and what difference would it make?

I really do not want to miss this opportunity. How shall I convey message to John that I will work very hard for him and with complete dedication. I just want to make him feel to hire me anyhow. But I do not know how to convey that message to him.

Ummm... just like that? Let him know that you will work hard and that you are committed to doing good work. Why would this be difficult to convey?

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No, do not mention your financial situation to anyone. He's a former colleague and soon-to-be manager, not your wife.

Don't worry about the rumours either, there's nothing you can do about that but treat it as a positive thing. Your former colleague wants to schedule an interview, so he already knows you're good for the team.

Finally, you reek of desperation. You said as much in your post, but I could tell before I got to that point. Don't let the panel figure that out. You must tough it out, convince yourself, and act as if you have other options. That's easier said than done, I know, but you have to do it for your future. I'm not advocating playing hardball or anything, but right now you're in a submissive mindset, and you gotta get yourself out of that dynamic.

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I have financially gone very weak and badly looking for job. Shall I indicate it to John? Would it look bad upon me? (He was my colleague then. But now he is manager)

No, just wait until the recruiter or hiring manager asks for your salary expectations to even broach the salary conversation. Don't lowball yourself because you are desperate - you should suggest an annual salary that is at least matching where you would be if you had stayed in the same role.

I got phones from my other ex-colleagues (from the same company) saying that they heard rumors that I am joining back.

Because your manager and co-workers are super-excited to have you back. Word is spreading that user1976551 wants to come back to Spacely Sprockets. That's a good sign.

When an employee leaves for more money or for a competitor, it can really hurt team morale and leave some managers and co-workers feeling sour. And while it's not a deal breaker, it doesn't help his cause to come back when that other job doesn't work out.

But when you left to do your own thing, you took a risk that was very well respected by everyone that you worked with. Everyone understands that startups fail.

I really do not want to miss this opportunity. How shall I convey message to John that I will work very hard for him and with complete dedication.

Just commit to the interview process as you would with any job. If it comes up in the interview about you getting the itch to do a startup again, it's a simple response: "I already tried the startup thing. While I'm glad I did it, and learned more than I ever could hope, it's an experience I don't plan on repeating anytime soon." I suspect your interview process at your old company may not be as technical, since your skills are not in doubt. They may be doing the interview process just to satisfy HR requirements and to validate you are fit for this new team from a personality perspective. Just keep it positive and relax.

Until then, you should still be sending your resume out and taking calls from other recruiters. Jobs opportunities fall apart all the time due to headcount and budget issues changing at the last minute. Until you have an offer in hand that you want to accept, you owe it to yourself to test this really good job market out right now.

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I'm not going to repeat what the others have said, but I completely agree with their points. Do not communicate your desperation. Nothing good can come of that.

I got phones from my other ex-colleagues (from the same company) saying that they heard rumors that I am joining back. After hearing this, I became little worried as these guys might create some impression about me on interview panel, that might cause interview process to become biased. Shall I inform about it to John?

You're not thinking clearly. Who do you think told those ex-colleagues about you? It was obviously John.

Besides, put yourself in John's shoes, a little bias can be a very good thing. If you hire someone, hiring a former colleague reduces a lot of the risks because you already know how well that person works and how well that person gets along with others.

In other words, John probably removed himself from the selection process because he wanted to maintain the appearance of objectivity, not because he was trying to create an atmosphere of perfect objectivity (which would be impossible and possibly counterproductive anyway).

I really do not want to miss this opportunity. How shall I convey message to John that I will work very hard for him and with complete dedication. I just want to make him feel to hire me anyhow. But I do not know how to convey that message to him.

Please don't! The more desperate you appear, the less likely you are to receive a job offer. This is human nature. The fact that you do not know this worries me.

And I know it's been said already by others, but let me say it again here. Do keep sending out resumes and do keep interviewing with other companies. You must do this for practical reasons.

But you must also do so to make yourself feel more confident. The more interviews you have (even if they're just in the pipeline). The more confident you will be during your interview with this one company you really want to work with.

And finally, the next time you apply for a position anywhere, check with LinkedIn first (there is even a browser extension you can install). And if you know a friendly former colleague who works at a company you want to apply for, ask that person first. Even if that person just tells you to apply through their HR portal, the very fact that you contacted him/her first can mean that he/she can put in a good word for you with HR.

When I used to work for HR (a long time ago), we even had a special checkbox in our database for resumes like that. The idea was that if someone internal referred someone to us, they would probably ask us about them again, so under no circumstance, could we lose that resume, nor could we screen out the candidate right away, otherwise our department could get in trouble. We also made sure that such resumes would be on top of the pile of resumes when a hiring manager looked at them (so they wouldn't be lost in the shuffle).

And in addition to that, since you're a software developer, it's also very possible that if someone refers you internally and that you get hired because of that referral, that the person who referred you will get a nice bonus for having referred you.

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