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I work for a few different marketing agencies. They get contracts with different clients to promote their products in retail stores. For a month I had been scheduled to work a particular shift that I was really looking forward to. To be proactive, I contacted my manager asking if there's anything else I should know for my shift tomorrow. She said I had been dropped. She also said because I had reminded her to tell me more than 24 hours before the start, I am no longer eligible for full pay.

To say I'm mad would be an understatement. There's a particular social media group everyone uses in my location for this type of work. I publicized the issue on it. A while later I got a call from an unknown number and I ignored it. Then they sent a text saying it was another company I do not recognize, and it's their fault my shift was cancelled. They said they would pay me but would like to speak over the phone. I said I preferred to stick to writing and they said they wanted a call (to apologize).

Should I be interested in an apology? Should I insist on sticking with writing? In addition to the lost work, I really was looking forward to the shift immensely (it would have been something I could have put on my resume). Is there any additional compensation I should ask for?

I have all of this fully documented. The phone call would be an undocumented part. I feel they have acted dishonestly and might lie saying I agreed to something I didn't agree to over the phone.

  • Would you feel better if you recorded the call? Where are you located? In most localities, it’s perfectly okay to record even without telling the other person on the call. – Jay Jun 26 at 23:25
  • Where is this? In what jurisdiction is this? What does your contract say? If the law and contract are not on your side, I would take the phone call. – Stephan Branczyk Jun 26 at 23:25
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    "She also said because I had reminded her to tell me more than 24 hours before the start, I am no longer eligible for full pay" - she is apparently no intelligent enough to see where that will lead :-) – Mawg Jun 27 at 6:59
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I have all of this fully documented. The phone call would be an undocumented part. I feel they have acted dishonestly and might lie saying I agreed to something I didn't agree to over the phone.

I say you take the call and accept any apologies and payments they want to give.

For the apologies you don't need to have it in writing.

However, if they are offering payment or compensation and they say that over the phone, politely ask them to send that specified in an email (so you can back up your claim).

Also, they can't provide a solid claim that you said anything unless you gave it in writing or recording, so don't worry about that as long as you have your stuff and offers documented.

Is there any additional compensation I should ask for?

I'd say no, unless you incurred in additional expenses or costs that wouldn't have been covered if the shift took place (which seems to me that you didn't, as they are offering to pay you despite the mishap).

The apology should be enough "additional" compensation to settle this. You could also ask if it's possible to reschedule the shift in a near future.

I know you are mad, but it's better to keep it professional, take the apology and payment and move on. Worst case you end up with the money and no experience (but no time lost). Best case you end up with the money, sincere apologies, and your shift rescheduled (and will eventually get the experience too).

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    Since it's from a company I hadn't even heard of, I'm a bit suspicious. Technically I never had any agreement or understanding with them. Do you think this is nothing to worry about? I'm guessing the company that hired me may be their client or something like that. – Bertelem Jun 27 at 8:03
  • I wouldn't worry about that – DarkCygnus Jun 27 at 23:39

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