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My original notice period was two months, but I told my new employer it was only one month. Based on that, I got shortlisted, attended the interview, and received an offer from them.

I am now being relieved from the services of the previous company, but they mentioned my resignation date in the relieving letter - (almost) two months ago, rather than one. On the positive side, my starting date at the new company is the same as the effective termination date at my old job.

Will my new company's HR department care that I gave them the wrong duration of the notice period? What can I tell them if they question me about it?

  • @SolarMike Because that was the shortlisting criteria . – John Thompson Jul 7 at 8:38
  • It may be the shortlisting criteria, but how did you get the date wrong... – Solar Mike Jul 7 at 9:11
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    How does 1 month notice differ from 1 month left of 2 months notice? Both come down to the same thing. You will be available in a month. – JustSaying Jul 7 at 9:21
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    Could you add a country to this - It doesn't sound like the UK (notice periods are negotiable) or the US (At-will employment) – Smock Jul 8 at 11:16
  • @Niko1978 Yeah I was thinking the same. Didn't want to assume though. – Smock Jul 8 at 13:39
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Will my new company's HR department care that I gave them the wrong duration of the notice period? What can I tell them if they question me about it?

That is an easy "problem": it is not a problem at all. What happens between you and the current (former) employer is not the business of the new employer - especially that the relationship will not affect the business.

It could have been a problem if the dates did not fit - so please remember that talking sh&t to the new employer can fire back at you. Now you were lucky, but one day the luck may end.

Another piece of information new employers love to know is your previous salary. Unless you live in a country where it is mandatory by law to disclose that information, you just tell the new employer that you will not disclose the matters between you and the previous employer.

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There are two things that an employer is interested in:

  • Can you start on the contractually agreed date?

    (Basically, can you keep your current contract)

  • Did you fulfill all your contractual duties to your old employer?

    (Basically, did you keep your old contract, because if not, it might become a pattern)

It seems you did both. You can start at the contractually agreed date and you kept to your old employers contract. Nobody should worry about the details of your old contract and if you recited them correctly, as long as everything worked out.

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