6

I recently started the process to join a great company. I passed the first steps (curriculum, chatting with HR), and now I'm supposed to take a technical test.

However, the recruiter messaged me today saying the position will be put on hold for now, and said I can take the test right now, and resume the process as soon as the position is reopened, or I can wait to take the test once the position is available again.

With that said, is there a standard way to proceed?

9

If you are prepared for the test then take it now. If you end up doing well, you will already be one step ahead of other potential candidates once the position is re-opened.

5

... is there a standard way to proceed?

Not really, at least as far as I know. Both sfo2's answer and onnoweb's answer have good points: On one hand, if you're ready for the test now, you should do well and then don't have to keep studying just to stay current (or don't have to cram later) and you may have a leg up on other candidates later; on the other hand, the position may never open up, and if it does the requirements may change.

More information is what is needed here. Some things you might want to ask before making a decision: Why was the position put on hold? How long will it be on hold? (As alluded to above) Will the requirements change? You might not get firm (or even honest) answers, but if the job was placed on hold because the supervisor just resigned, it tells you something different than if the budget got cut.

Another factor: are you ready for the test now? If not, a delay to study up might help. You just have to be sure to keep studying until you can take the test.

Finally: Is this a test that will cost you somehow? Not just the possibility that you might have to pay for it, but would you have to take a vacation day (or leave without pay) from your current job, or maybe have to travel to the testing site? For me, taking the test in the evening while at home and wearing my pajamas is a lot more enticing that taking a day off, maybe getting dressed up, and driving out of my way to take a test for a job I might get considered for ... someday.

3

I would wait. That position may never re-open and if or when it does its description or requirements may have changed, the hiring manager may be different. It's likely that your test results will not have been saved. Many companies have policies about how long they keep such information around. Will they even look at it?

1

Take the test but consider it as merely a practice (as in, an exercise) for other tests in other interviews (for other companies).

Better to screw up in a situation that will likely not result in anything anyway; it's a good practice, with nothing to lose, and it will allow you more self-confidence in the future when it really counts.

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